College of Arts and Sciences Advising

O'Dowd Hall, Room 130
586 Pioneer Drive
Rochester, MI 48309-4482
(location map)
(248) 370-4567
casadv@oakland.edu

College of Arts and Sciences
Dean's Office

Varner Hall, Room 217
371 Varner Drive
Rochester, MI 48309-4485
(location map)
(248) 370-2140
Fax: (248) 370-4280
cas@oakland.edu

stack of books in library

Professional Development Conferences

Teaching Race in America: A Professional Development Conference

How do we discuss the nation’s racial past and present in our classrooms and communities?

How do we honestly examine and confront the history of race in the United States in today’s contentious environment?

How should teachers respond to those who want to exclude any discussion of systemic racism in our history, our culture, our institutions, and our economy?

On August 9, 2023, Oakland University will host a conference that brings together secondary and university educators to discuss pedagogical methods for teaching race in America. “Teaching Race in America: A Professional Development Continuing Education Conference” is a collaborative effort by high school educators and Oakland faculty.

Call for Proposals

How do we discuss our nation’s racial past and present in our classrooms and communities? How do we honestly examine and confront the history of race in the United States in today’s contentious environment? How should teachers respond to those who want to exclude any discussion of systemic racism in our history, culture, institutions, and economy?

 
On August 9, 2023, Oakland University will host a conference that brings together secondary and university educators to discuss pedagogical methods for teaching race in America. “Teaching Race in America: A Professional Development Conference” is a collaborative effort by high school educators and Oakland University faculty. Our keynote presenter will be Nikole Hannah-Jones, Pulitzer Prize-Winning investigative reporter for the New York Times and creator of the 1619 Project. Lunch-time presenters will include Roy Finkenbine (Director of the Black Abolitionist Archive and Professor of History, University of Detroit-Mercy) and Carlin Borsheim-Black (Professor of English Language and Literature, Central Michigan University and author of Letting Go of Literary Whiteness: Antiracist Literature Instruction for White Students).

We are seeking proposals for workshops aimed at sharing effective classroom strategies. Possible subjects include approaches to teaching historical events and issues (such as native dispossession, abolition, the legacy of slavery, lynching, and immigration); literary and cinematic texts (Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye and other newly banned books); contemporary movements and social protests (Black Lives Matter, Land Back); legal and political developments (border security, the assault on voting rights), and more. We welcome proposals that address the conference’s focus on Social Studies and English Language Arts. Collaborative proposals are strongly encouraged.

Sessions will be 45 minutes long and may take many forms: panel presentations, roundtable discussions, workshops highlighting specific strategies or materials, “lightning” sessions, or other creative formats. Whatever the case, all sessions should focus on curricular development, sharing practical strategies and resources, and/or fostering conversation and dialogue between secondary teachers, university faculty, and community members in a spirit of shared inquiry and learning. Presenters should plan to provide concrete supporting materials (bibliographies, text sets, archival material, instructional activities, etc.) and practices (lesson plans, discussion questions, in- or out-of-class activities, and more). Regardless of format, we recommend that all sessions reserve time for questions, comments, and discussion.

Proposals for interactive presentations, workshops, and roundtables should include:

Title

Teaching Area 

Target Audience 

Content

Structure/Format

Outcomes/Takeaways

Submission Portal

Deadline for submissions: March 23, 2023.

Keynote Presenters

Nikole Hannah-Jones, Keynote Presenter

Nikole Hannah-Jones is an award-winning investigative reporter who covers civil rights and racial injustice for The New York Times Magazine.  Nikole got hooked on journalism when she joined her high school newspaper and began writing about students like her, who were bused across town as part of a voluntary school desegregation program. Prior to joining The New York Times, Nikole worked as an investigative reporter at ProPublica in New York City, where she spent three years chronicling the way official policy created and maintains segregation in housing and schools. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the MacArthur Foundation Fellowship (2017), the National Association of Black Journalists Journalist of the Year (2015), the George Polk Award for radio reporting (2016), the Pulitzer Prize (2020), and NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work-Nonfiction for The 1619 Project: A New Origin Story. Currently, Hannah-Jones is the Knight Chair of Race and Journalism at Howard University, where she founded the Center for Journalism & Democracy. 

Roy Finkenbine, Keynote Presenter

Roy E. Finkenbine is Professor of History and Director of the Black Abolitionist Archive at the University of Detroit Mercy, where he teaches courses in African American history, modern Africa, slave resistance, the Civil War era, and the Underground Railroad.  He previously taught at Hampton University.  While on the editorial staff of the Black Abolitionist Papers Project at Florida State University in the 1980s and 1990s, he coedited the five-volume Black Abolitionist Papers, 1830-1865 (1985-1992) and Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation (1993). He has authored Sources of the African American Past (1st ed., 1997; 2nd ed., 2004), as well as over a dozen articles and book chapters related to the black abolitionists, reparations for slavery, and the Underground Railroad.  He serves on the Michigan Freedom Trail Commission.  His op-eds have appeared in the History News Network, Time, Newsweek, RawStory, AlterNet and Faithfully Magazine. Currently, Finkenbine is completing a book entitled The Indigenous Underground Railroad: Freedom Seekers and First Nations Peoples in the Old Northwest.

Carlin Borsheim-Black, Keynote Presenter

Dr. Carlin Borsheim-Black is an award-winning teacher-researcher and professor of English education in the Department of English, Language, and Literature at Central Michigan University. Borsheim-Black’s teaching and scholarship focus on possibilities and challenges of antiracist teaching in the context of literature study, especially in predominantly white classrooms and communities. Her book, Letting Go of Literary Whiteness: Antiracist Literature Instruction for White Students, co-authored with Dr. Sophia Tatiana Sarigianides, offers English teachers specific practices for merging goals for racial literacy with goals for literature instruction in secondary English classrooms. The book was recognized with the 2022 Outstanding Book Award by the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. Borsheim-Black’s research has been published in Research in the Teaching of English, English Education, Teachers College Record, and Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy. She currently serves as co-editor of Michigan Reading Journal.

Contact Us

If you have any questions about the conference or would like to be put on our mailing list for conference updates, please send an email to OUteachingconf@oakland.edu.