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International Education

O'Dowd Hall, Room 328
586 Pioneer Drive
Rochester, MI 48309-4482
(location map)
(248) 370-2889
ie@oakland.edu

Office hours
Mon - Fri: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

In-person and virtual advising hours
Mon - Fri: 9 a.m. - noon and 1 - 4 p.m.

Walk-in advising hours
Mon - Thurs: 1 - 3 p.m.

Alex Zimmerman, Director
(248) 370-2843
azimmerman@oakland.edu

International Education

O'Dowd Hall, Room 328
586 Pioneer Drive
Rochester, MI 48309-4482
(location map)
(248) 370-2889
ie@oakland.edu

Office hours
Mon - Fri: 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.

In-person and virtual advising hours
Mon - Fri: 9 a.m. - noon and 1 - 4 p.m.

Walk-in advising hours
Mon - Thurs: 1 - 3 p.m.

Alex Zimmerman, Director
(248) 370-2843
azimmerman@oakland.edu

A street in Veracruz with palm trees on one side and a white building on the other.

Traditional Medicine and Food Sustainability in Mexico

Experience firsthand “Traditional Medicine beyond Western Drugs” or “Food Sustainability, Where is our food coming from?” in the state of Veracruz, Mexico in Summer 2023. The two-week programs take place in the region of Veracruz, including activities in the towns of Xalapa Huatusco, Orizaba and other regional areas. Immerse in the region and experience indigenous site visits. Enroll in BIO 4900 and travel to Mexico for 14 nights.

Travel dates for both programs are June 10 – 24, 2023. Application deadline and deposit is February 15, 2023.

Apply Now

Traditional Medicine beyond Western drugs

For more information, contact Program Director, Dr. Gerard Madlambayan, Ph.D. at madlamba@oakland.edu.

Where you will be

Arrive in Veracruz, a port city on the Gulf of Mexico coast in the state of Veracruz, one of Mexico’s oldest and largest ports, founded in the 16th century by Spanish settlers. The adventure in Mexico begins with a historic and cultural trip to Islote de la Vera Cruz, the archaeological site of Zempoala from the Olmeca culture and the town La Antigue, a location Hernan Cortez settled, as well as Fort San Juan in Ulua Veracruz city.

Travel continues to Catemaco, located in the south of the state of Veracruz, and located on Lake Catemaco, with the municipality stretching north to the Gulf of Mexico. 

Spend three days in Huatusco, located in the central mountainous region of the state of Veracruz. Visit Orizaba, known for its colonial buildings and the art nouveau Palacio de Hierro, which was brought from Belgium in the 1890s. Overlooking the city is the Cerro del Borrego peak, which is accessible by cable car. Northwest is the snow-capped Pico de Orizaba volcano.

On day 11, the group travels to Coatepec, known for its coffee and many traditions, with the most important being The Feast of Sán Jerónimo. The foods in Coatepec most popular with locals and tourists include Tamales, Chilaquiles, Emmoladas, Gorditas, Lupitas, Enfrijoladas, among others.

The twelfth and thirteenth days include travel to Xalapa, the capital city of the Mexican state of Veracruz, surrounded by volcanoes and a cloud forest. The nearby Parque Juárez offers views of Mexico’s highest mountain, Pico de Orizaba.

Nearing the completion of the journey, travel continues to Jacomulco, a city founded in 1825 and located in the central zone of the state. The Río de los Pescados section of the Rio Antigua is a whitewater river that flows through the town of Jalcomulco and is commercially rafted. Other activities in town include rappelling, climbing, hiking, Tyrolean crossing, mountain biking, landscape photography and temazcal.

What you will do and learn

Students will enroll in BIO 4900, Summer I for 2 credit hours. The course will introduce students to the alternative health benefits of traditional medicine and how it differs from Western medicine. Immersive studies in various locations will take advantage of the region’s capacities including indigenous site visits and participation in “hands on” activities to learn about where plants are grown, harvested, processed and sold for use as therapies for various disorders. Discussion includes how traditional medicine is integrated alongside Western practices. Laboratory exercises alongside faculty and students at local universities, including the Universidad Veracruzana, will provide a unique learning experience.

Students who complete this course will be able to:

  • Identify and record regional natural sources of Mexican traditional medicine
  • Compare and contrast traditional and Western medicine and their use in health care
  • Evaluate the pros and cons of the integration of traditional medicine alongside Western practices into daily health
  • Analyze plant chemistry for compounds used in traditional medicine in laboratory settings
  • Relate traditional medicine compounds to their physiological function
  • Appreciate the benefits of traditional medicine in daily health care
  • Analyze nutrient levels in foods grown in intensive versus organic conditions
What to bring

Students will attend a pre-departure meeting and receive a list of items to bring.

Requirements

Prerequisites: BIO 1200 and instructor permission. The number of students will be capped at 15. Undergraduates from the Biology and Chemistry Departments and the School of Health Sciences can apply to the program. Priority will be given to students who have taken BIO 1200.

Cost

Program cost  - $2,600

Meals - Some meals included

Transportation - included

Housing -  included

Airfare - included

Excursions - included

Health Insurance - included

Personal expenses - $200

Tuition for the course (2 credits) - not included in the program price.

Financial Aid may apply. Scholarships and program stipends available!

Food Sustainability, Where is our food coming from?

For more information, contact Program Director, Associate Professor Luis G. Villa Diaz at luisvilladiaz@oakland.edu.

Where you will be

Arrive in Veracruz, a port city on the Gulf of Mexico coast in the state of Veracruz, one of Mexico’s oldest and largest ports, founded in the 16th century by Spanish settlers. The adventure in Mexico begins with a historic and cultural trip to Islote de la Vera Cruz, the archaeological site of Zempoala from the Olmeca culture and the town La Antigue, a location Hernan Cortez settled, as well as Fort San Juan in Ulua Veracruz city.

Travel continues to Catemaco, located in the south of the state of Veracruz, and located on Lake Catemaco, with the municipality stretching north to the Gulf of Mexico. 

Spend three days in Huatusco, located in the central mountainous region of the state of Veracruz. Visit Orizaba, known for its colonial buildings and the art nouveau Palacio de Hierro, which was brought from Belgium in the 1890s. Overlooking the city is the Cerro del Borrego peak, which is accessible by cable car. Northwest is the snow-capped Pico de Orizaba volcano.

On day 11, the group travels to Coatepec, known for its coffee and many traditions, with the most important being The Feast of Sán Jerónimo. The foods in Coatepec most popular with locals and tourists include Tamales, Chilaquiles, Emmoladas, Gorditas, Lupitas, Enfrijoladas, among others.

The twelfth and thirteenth days include travel to Xalapa, the capital city of the Mexican state of Veracruz, surrounded by volcanoes and a cloud forest. The nearby Parque Juárez offers views of Mexico’s highest mountain, Pico de Orizaba.

Nearing the completion of the journey, travel continues to Jacomulco, a city founded in 1825 and located in the central zone of the state. The Río de los Pescados section of the Rio Antigua is a whitewater river that flows through the town of Jalcomulco and is commercially rafted. Other activities in town include rappelling, climbing, hiking, Tyrolean crossing, mountain biking, landscape photography and temazcal.

What you will do and learn

Students will enroll in BIO  4900, Summer I for 2 credit hours and participate in a field-based introduction to the study of food sustainability with an emphasis on providing students with first-hand experiences in the production of food of animal and crops origin based on high mountain, coastal and tropical ecosystems and biodiversity. The proposed course will be conducted in diverse geographical areas of the state of Veracruz, where rain and tropical forests, and coastal and high mountain terrain ecosystems are all readily accessible. Laboratory exercises alongside faculty and students at local universities, including the Universidad Veracruzana, will provide a unique learning experience. Laboratory exposure will meet the biology major laboratory experience requirement.

Students who complete this course will be able to:

  • Evaluate the pro and cons between intensive/industrial farming and rural/organic farming
  • Appreciate permaculture and its impact on the environment compared to intensive farming
  • Acquiring knowledge of husbandry and zootechnic practices used in chicken, pork and beef farming
  • Identify and record the effect of geographical regions on the production of food
  • Analyze nutrient levels in foods grown in intensive versus organic conditions
What to bring

Students will attend a pre-departure meeting and receive a list of items to bring.

Requirements

Prerequisites: BIO 1200 and instructor permission. The number of students will be capped at 10. Undergraduates from the Biology and Chemistry Departments and the School of Health Sciences and pre-vet students can apply to the program. Priority will be given to students who have taken BIO 1200.

Cost

Program cost  - $2,600

Meals - Some meals included

Transportation - included

Housing -  included

Airfare- included

Excursions - included

Health Insurance - included

Personal expenses - $200

Tuition for the course (2 credits) - not included in the program price.

Financial Aid may apply. Scholarships and program stipends available!