Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Google Plus
Graduate Student Ekaterini Iordanou Publishes in Cell and Tissue Research
Monday, November 25, 2013
Graduate Student Ekaterini Iordanou Publishes in Cell and Tissue Research
Ekaterini Iordanou, a graduate student in the Biomedical Sciences: Biological Communication PhD program, is one of the lead authors on a recent review article about Novel Mechanisms of Tube-Size Regulation Revealed by the Drosophila Trachea published in the November 2013 issue of Cell and Tissue Research (Volume 354, Pages 343-354). Iordanou works in the laboratory of Assistant Professor Lan Jiang in the Department of Biological Sciences. Other coauthors on this study include graduate student Rachana Chandran and former faculty member Li Zuo.

Jiang’s research uses the fruit fly Drosophila as a model system to learn more about tube formation during development. The lessons learned may provide insights into human diseases of organs such as the lungs and kidney. The abstract of the paper is reproduced below.
The size of various tubes within tubular organs such as the lung, vascular system and kidney must be finely tuned for the optimal delivery of gases, nutrients, waste and cells within the entire organism. Aberrant tube sizes lead to devastating human illnesses, such as polycystic kidney disease, fibrocystic breast disease, pancreatic cystic neoplasm and thyroid nodules. However, the underlying mechanisms that are responsible for tube-size regulation have yet to be fully understood. Therefore, no effective treatments are available for disorders caused by tube-size defects. Recently, the Drosophila tracheal system has emerged as an excellent in vivo model to explore the fundamental mechanisms of tube-size regulation. Here, we discuss the role of the apical luminal matrix, cell polarity and signaling pathways in regulating tube size in Drosophila trachea. Previous studies of the Drosophila tracheal system have provided general insights into epithelial tube morphogenesis. Mechanisms that regulate tube size in Drosophila trachea could be well conserved in mammalian tubular organs. This knowledge should greatly aid our understanding of tubular organogenesis in vertebrates and potentially lead to new avenues for the treatment of human disease caused by tube-size defects.
Jiang’s laboratory is supported by a grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences, one of the National Institutes of Health (R15GM100369).


AcademicsUndergraduate AdmissionsGraduate AdmissionsOnline ProgramsSchool of MedicineProfessional & Continuing EducationHousingFinancial Aid & ScholarshipsTuitionAbout OUCurrent Student ResourcesAcademic DepartmentsAcademic AdvisingEmergenciesFinancial ServicesGeneral EducationGet InvolvedGraduate StudiesGraduation & CommencementKresge LibraryOU BookstoreRegistrationAthleticsGive to OUGrizzlinkAlumni EngagementCommunity ResourcesDepartment of Music, Theatre & DanceMeadow Brook HallMeadow Brook TheatreOU Art GalleryPawley InstituteGolf and Learning CenterRecreation CenterUniversity Human ResourcesAdministrationCenter for Excellence in Teaching & LearningInstitutional Research & AssessmentInformation TechnologyReport a Behavioral ConcernTrainingAcademic Human Resources
Oakland University | 2200 N. Squirrel Road, Rochester, Michigan 48309-4401 | (248) 370-2100 | Contact OU | OU-Macomb
Coordinate map of Auburn Hills Entrance