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Course Descriptions




Anthropology Courses

AN 101 Human and Cultural Evolution (4)
Introduction to physical anthropology and archaeology as applied to human and cultural evolution. Stress placed on human adaptation to environment. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.

AN 102 Culture and Human Nature (4)
Introduction to cultural and social anthropology with emphasis on the continuing human adaptation to the environment and especially the interactions among culture, society and natural environment. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area or global perspective knowledge exploration area, not both.

AN 190 Current Issues in Anthropology (4)
Designed for the general student, this course examines issues of current interest in anthropology. Topic will be announced at the time of offering.

AN 200 Global Human Systems (4)
Introductory survey of the worldwide distribution, variation and interconnections of cultural, economic and political systems. Basic concepts in the field of human geography and other social sciences, as relevant, are introduced as are techniques and tools used in carrying out and expressing geographic analysis. Identical with IS 200 and GEO 200. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the global perspective knowledge exploration area.

AN 210 Applied Anthropology (4)
Introduces applied anthropology through an examination of cross-cultural training in various fields, such as business, education, economic development, cultural resource management and medical anthropology. Various data collection methods and techniques as well as interpretive strategies are examined. Prerequisite: AN 102.

AN 222 Introduction to Anthropological Archaeology (4)
Introduces the field of anthropological archaeology through examination of theory. data collection methods and techniques, and interpretive strategies used to understand human histories, lifeways and cultural processes.

AN 271 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion (4)
Anthropological theories of magic, witchcraft and religion: human interaction with beings, creatures and forces that manifest extraordinary powers; folk beliefs of non-literate people; and transformation of social systems by religious movements. Identical with REL 271. Prerequisite: AN 102 or sophomore standing.

AN 282 The Prehistoric Origins of Civilization (4)
The development and spread of culture in the period before written history, using archaeological evidence from Neolithic Old World and New World sites. Cultural evolution from early farming and settlement to the rise of complex civilization. Prerequisite: AN 101.

AN 300 Culture, Society and Technology (4)
Technology has played a critical role in all human evolution. This course provides a historical overview of the ways in which culture has shaped technology and how technology changes cultures. It emphasizes the impact of technology on modern cultures, especially technology emanating from the Western industrial revolution. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area or the Western civilization knowledge exploration area, not both.

AN 302 Anthropological Research Methods (4)
Techniques of anthropological research emphasizing field research methods in cultural anthropology. May include some field work practice. Prerequisite: AN 102 or SOC 100.

AN 305 The Life Course in Anthropological Perspective (4)
Socialization from infancy to old age will be considered with examples drawn from a variety of nonindustrial societies as well as the literature on primates. Theories of human development across cultures will be viewed in light of this evidence. Identical with WGS 305.

AN 307 Culture and Society Through Film (4)
The systematic study of selected peoples from different cultures through the ethnographic film and appropriate readings, lectures and discussions. Students learn to evaluate cultural data according to various anthropological concepts and methodologies.

AN 308 Native American Art (4)
Identical with AH 308. Prerequisite: 4 credits in art history.

AN 309 Pre-Columbian Art (4)
Identical with AH 309. Prerequisite: 4 credits in art history or IS 250.

AN 310 Psychological Anthropology (4)
Focuses on the relationship of culture and the individual; considers personality, perception, dreams, and other areas of psychological functioning in cross-cultural perspective and in relation to culture and personality theory. Prerequisite: AN 102.

AN 320 Law and Society (4)
Identical with SOC 320. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205 or AN 102.

AN 322 The Food Quest (4)
Relationship of environment, subsistence activities and food-related technologies in a variety of nonindustrial societies, including both societies of food collectors and food producers. Identical with ENV 322.

AN 331 Racial and Ethnic Relations (4)
Identical with SOC 331. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205 or AN 102.

AN 333 Medical Anthropology (4)

Interaction between biological, ethnopsychiatric and sociocultural environments in health, illness and treatment. Includes historical, organizational, demographic, ecological and other problems in health care delivery. Prerequisite: AN 102 or SOC 100 or PSY 100.

AN 337 Women's Lives in Cross-Cultural Perspective (4)
The lives of women in a variety of tribal and peasant societies, noting how beliefs, rituals and taboos shape the stages of the female life course and how culture influences womení’s reproductive and economic roles. Identical with WGS 337. Prerequisite: AN 102 or WGS 200.

AN 350 World Regional Geography (4)
Comparative study of world’s major geographic regions, applying data, methods and theory of geographical analysis. Students will acquire familiarity with these regions and the geographic factors that help to account for their similarities and differences. Interaction between regions will also be examined. Identical with IS 350 and GEO 350. Prerequisite: AN 200 or IS 200 or GEO 200.

AN 361 Peoples and Cultures of India (4)
A survey of contemporary society and culture on the Indian subcontinent, with focus on India, Pakistan and Bangladesh; emphasis on social structure, folk religion and the problems of sociocultural change. Prerequisite: AN 102 or IS 240.

AN 362 Peoples and Cultures of China (4)
An anthropological study of China, stressing the variety of cultural and ecological adaptations characteristic of that complex society. Prerequisite: AN 102 or IS 210.

AN 363 The Asian American Experience (4)
History of Asian migration to North America and adjustment patterns of Asian American immigrants. Students will study Americanization by making maps, charting kinships, interviewing informants, collecting and documenting life histories, analyzing folklore and taking photographs. Prerequisite: AN 102 or SOC 100 or permission of instructor.

AN 370 Archaeology of Mesoamerica (4)
The pre-Hispanic culture of Mexico and Guatemala, the Aztecs and Mayas, and their neighboring and derivative cultures. Detailed discussion of the major archaeological sites. Prerequisite: AN 101 or AN 102.

AN 371 Peoples and Cultures of Mexico and Central America (4)
Anthropological studies of Indian and Mestizo societies in Mexico and Guatemala, including their separate socio-economic patterns and their integration into a dualistic social system. Prerequisite: AN 102 or IS 250.

AN 372 Indians of South America (4)
A survey of the native South Americans. Includes warriors of the jungles, peasants and herders of the mountains, nomads of the plains and forests, and subsistence fishermen of the southern coasts. Prerequisite: AN 102 or IS 250.

AN 374 Cross-Cultural Communication (4)
Identical with ALS 374. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.

AN 375 Language and Culture (4)
Identical with ALS 375.

AN 380 Archaeology of North America (4)
The evolution of native North American cultures (including Mesoamerica) from 50,000 B.C. to 1500 A.D., with emphasis on the ecological factors in the development of culture areas. Prerequisite: AN 101.

AN 381 Peoples and First Nations of North America (4)
The cultures of certain Native Americans and Inuit (Eskimo) societies both in traditional times and in their relationship with Western society. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Prerequisite: AN 102.

AN 382 Advanced Physical Anthropology (4)
The emergence and diversification of the human species in relation to the morphology and ecology of both modern and fossil man, including physical and physiological variation (sex, race and age), climatic adaptation and population genetics. Prerequisite: AN 101.

AN 383 Methods in Anthropological Archaeology (4 or 8)
Instruction and field research including site location, excavation and artifact analysis, and conservation. If taken once for 4 credits, may be repeated once more for 4 credits. Prerequisite: AN 101.

AN 384 Museum Studies in Archaeology (4 or 8)
The organization, goals and funding of archeological museums. Career preparation including hands-on practical experience in acquisitions, cataloging, preservation, display design and preparation, display evaluation, museum education and outreach programs. Prerequisite: AN 101 or 383 or permission of instructor.

AN 385 Historical Archaeology (4)
Study of historic cultures, lifeways, and processes of change through combined analysis of documents and material culture, such as settlement patterns, architecture, gravestones, and excavated ceramics, glass or metal. Special attention given to intersecting cultural structures of gender, race, ethnicity, and class. Identical with WGS 385. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge application integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge application integration: completion of the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Prerequisites: AN 101 or AN 102 or permission of instructor.

AN 391 Primate Behavior (4)
Various bio-social factors that aid the nonhuman primates in their adaptation to the environment, implications for human behavior, classroom discussions and field studies. Prerequisite: AN 101 or 102 or PSY 100 or SOC 100 or HRD 301.

AN 392 Current Problems in Anthropology (4)
Seminar in which a topic or problem is studied in depth. Each seminar requires independent readings and writing. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle for up to 8 credits. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 205 and instructor permission.

AN 395 Special Topics in Anthropology (4)
Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. May be used for approved course work taken during study abroad. Prerequisite: anthropology major or permission of instructor.

AN 399 Field Experience in Anthropology (4)
Field experience in anthropology with faculty supervision. An academic project related to the departmental discipline that incorporates student performance in an occupational setting. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing; 16 credits in anthropology, of which at least 8 must be at the 300/400 level, and permission of the instructor.

AN 401 Social Anthropology (4)
Examines social structure and social organization in anthropological perspective. Entails the study of economic, political, religious and kinship systems in the social life of man. Prerequisite: AN 102.
AN 410 Human Adaptation (4) Examines current theory on the cultural and biological adaptation of human groups to natural and social environments. Identical with ENV 410. Prerequisite: AN 101, 102 or 322.

AN 430 Systems of Wealth and Power in Anthropological Perspective (4)
Concepts and methods of political and economic anthropology, emphasizing the interrelated state of political and economic phenomena, with particular reference to pre-industrial, non-Western societies. Prerequisite: AN 102.

AN 470 Anthropological Theory (4)
Surveys the major developments in the history of anthropological theory and traces their impact on present trends in the field. Introduces current theoretical perspectives. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Prerequisites: AN 102. Must be an anthropology major.

AN 480 Independent Study and Research (2 or 4)
A tutorial in which the student will pursue a course of reading and research with the instructor. May be repeated only once for credit. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

AN 497 Apprentice College Teaching (2 or 4)
Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in anthropology, combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for anthropological presentation. May be taken only once for credit toward a major. Prerequisite: senior anthropology major and permission of instructor.



Criminal Justice Courses

CRJ 100  Introduction to Criminal Justice (4)
Introduction to the study of crime and criminal justice in the United States. Provides an overview of crime statistics, types of offenses, police roles, courts and correctional agencies, and public policy. Includes a comparison of street crime with white-collar crime. Required for all majors and minors in criminal justice.

CRJ 200 Criminological Theory (4)
Provides foundational knowledge about criminological theory essential for success in more advanced criminal justice courses. Topics include the origins of criminology in the United States and both classical and contemporary criminological theoretical approaches to the study of crime, crime causation, and crime control strategies. Required for all majors and minors in criminal justice. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 300  Alcohol, Drugs & Society (4)
Overview of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Reviews sociological perspectives, social control of alcohol and drugs, descriptions of alcohol/drug behavior and treatment programs. Explores how substance abuse problems can be addressed by policy makers, lawmakers, health care professionals, and criminal justice officials. Identical with SOC 300. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 or SOC 100.

CRJ 320  Criminology and Public Policy (4)
Overview of problems conducting research and policy evaluation in criminal justice agencies, including history of policy research and the emergence of evidence-based criminal justice research on issues such as deterrence, rehabilitation, gun control, sex offenders, drug use/prevention, sentencing practices, mass incarceration, community based-corrections and democratic policing. Prerequisites: CRJ 100 and 200.

CRJ 323  Delinquency and Juvenile Justice (4)
Overview of the nature and types of delinquency, its relation to adolescence and the social situation, and processing by the juvenile justice system. Examines juvenile court procedures, detention facilities, adjudication issues such as transfer to adult court, and life without parole sentences and delinquency prevention and treatment programs. Identical with SOC 323. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 325  Corrections & Rehabilitative Institutions (4)
Overview of prison and correctional systems in the United States. Includes reviews of the historical development of corrections and current issues in corrections, including sentencing practices, overcrowding, race relations, budget constraints, AIDS and substance abuse. Explores ways in which these problems are addressed by criminal justice practitioners. Identical with SOC 325. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 327 Police & Society (4)
Examines the history and role of the police in modern society. Special attention given to analyzing the police subculture and the problems inherent in the control of the citizenry and police, the dynamics of police-citizen encounters, handling special populations, the police as a quasi-militaristic bureaucracy, the impact of information and surveillance techniques on the police organization and issues of police deviance. Identical with SOC 327. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 329 Criminal Law & the Courts (4)
Overview of the criminal law and sentencing within the U.S. criminal justice system. Focuses on criminal law and procedures as it relates to the processing of criminal offenders by the courts. The roles of judges, court officers, jury and attorneys are described and analyzed in the context of their professional matrix. Identical with SOC 329. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 330 Women, Crime & Justice (4)
Exploration of various issues related to women’s experiences with the criminal justice system as offenders, victims, and practitioners. Uses feminist criminological scholarship to examine: the historical place of women in the study of crime, explanations of men’s and women’s offending, the relationship between women’s victimization and offending behaviors, and the role of women in traditionally male-dominated criminal justice careers. Identical with WGS 330. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 or WGS 200.

CRJ 332 Race/Ethnicity, Crime & Justice (4)
Socio-historical analysis of the effects of race and ethnicity on legitimate social opportunities, criminal behavior, victimization, and differential judicial processing. Analysis of the impact of assimilation and acculturation on criminal behavior, victimization, and criminal justice processes. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 340 White-Collar Crime (4)
Overview of white-collar crime and deviance, corporate and organizational crime, and political crimes both by and against the state. Prerequisites: CRJ 100 and 200.

CRJ 341 Cybercrime (4)
Overview of cybercrime from a criminal justice perspective. Examines types of computer and cybercrimes, the hacker subculture, cybercrime prevention, information security and investigative methodologies, and the legal and social issues (e.g., jurisdiction, privacy) inherent in detection and control. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

CRJ 342 The Surveillance Society (4)
Explores the development and significance of surveillance as a feature of modern society, how surveillance has changed over time with the development of new technologies, its presence in everyday life and different social institutions and contexts and the degree to which surveillance enhances social participation or social control in society. Identical with SOC 342. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 or SOC 100.

CRJ 346 Profiling and Threat Assessment (4)
Critical examination of criminal profiling including crime scene profiling (inductive and deductive), psychological profiling, and offender profiling. Discusses ethnic, racial, and behavioral profiling, equivocal death analysis and the geographical profiling of serial killers and rapists. Reviews threat assessment models as applied to school shooters, stalking behavior and terrorists with emphasis on the empirical validity of profiling and threat assessment intelligence analysis. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 or SOC 100 or instructor permission.   

CRJ 348 Terrorism and Homeland Security (4)
Examines the threat of terrorism within U.S. borders, countermeasures employed to protect critical infrastructures and the key resources of homeland security. Critically reviews the effectiveness of anti-terror and counter-terror strategy and tactics. Topics include: homegrown terrorists, “lone wolves,” hit squads and sleeper cells, the radicalization process and jihadist ideologies, targeted killings, enhanced interrogation techniques, behavioral profiling, and biometric deception and detection. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 or SOC 100 or instructor permission.

CRJ 360 Criminal Careers & Career Criminals (4)
Overview of types of juvenile and adult criminal careers. Examines patterns of offending and desistance across the live course, and the individual, cultural, and structural factors that influence motivations and opportunities for both offending and desistance. Prerequisite: CRJ 100 and CRJ 200.

CRJ 365 Critical Incident Analysis (4)
Analysis of critical incidents – relatively brief and usually traumatic occurrences involving injury, loss, conflict, discovery or change of significant proportion with the potential to alter existing societal norms or threaten the bonds of trust that bind communities. Examines the types of incidents (natural events, human error/accidents, intentional acts/terrorism), and the responses at the local, state, and national levels to understand similarities and differences among incidents. Prerequisites: CRJ 100 or SOC 100 or instructor permission.

CRJ 395 Special Topics: Criminal Justice Elective (4)
Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under a different subtitle. Prerequisites: criminal justice major or minor, or instructor permission.

CRJ 430 Internship in Criminal Justice (4)
Field placement and supervision of students in an approved criminal justice agency requiring the completion of associated course work to receive academic credit. Prerequisites: completion of all required and core major classes, junior standing, and approval of director of field placement.

CRJ 480 Independent Study & Research (2 or 4)
Directed individual reading and research. Prerequisite: instructor permission.

CRJ 490 Capstone: Criminal Justice Policy Analysis (4)
Capstone seminar where students demonstrate the ability to link theoretical knowledge and empirical evidence about a key criminal justice question to inform and improve public policy. Prerequisite: completion of all required and core major classes and senior standing.

CRJ 495 Special Topics: Capstone Level Project (4)
Qualifies as a capstone experience in the major. Course content to be determined by instructor. Prerequisite: senior standing and instructor permission.

CRJ 497 Apprentice College Teaching (4)
Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in criminal justice, combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for presentation of criminal justice curriculum. May be taken only once for credit toward a major. Prerequisite: criminal justice major and instructor permission.



Social Work Courses

SW 210 Introduction to Social Work (4)
Study of the social work profession and the social context of welfare policies; the relationships between social structure and the development of social work practice; and public and private welfare organizations. Identical with SOC 210. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or two courses in psychology or human resource development.

SW 310 Human Behavior and Social Environment I (4)
Theories of human behavior and social environment. Examines biological, psychological, social, spiritual development in humans from birth to adolescence. Social systems theory is applied to analyze interactions between human behavior and social institutions. Explores role of culture, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation in human development and behavior. Prerequisite: SW 210; BIO 104 or 111; PSY 100; SOC 100; and admission to social work program.

SW 311 Human Behavior and Social Environment II (4)
Presents theories of human behavior and social environment. Examines biological, psychological, social, spiritual development in humans from early to late adulthood. Social systems theory is applied to analyze interactions between human behavior and social institutions. Explores role of culture, race, ethnicity, social class, gender, sexual orientation in human development and behavior. Prerequisite: SW 310 and admission to social work program.

SW 315 Social Welfare Policies
(4)
Survey of the development of social welfare programs in the U.S. and internationally. Issues related to the problems of poverty, policy analysis and program evaluation related to social welfare in the U.S. and other countries are examined. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Identical with SOC 315. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC 210 or SW 210.

SW 318 Foundations for Multicultural Social Work (4)
Prepares students to work with multicultural and diverse populations. Emphasis on defining and developing skills for culturally competent social work generalist practice. Prerequisite: SW 310, 315 or permission of instructor.

SW 395 Special Topics in Social Work
(4)
Special topic for which no course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. Prerequisite: social work major or permission of instructor.

SW 405 Social Work Practice I (4)
Prepares students for generalist social work practice involving individuals, families, other groups. Emphasizes how to engage clients, assess needs, provide intervention, terminate intervention, evaluate outcomes. Provides conceptual framework for practicing social work in diverse settings; prepares students with skills for field placement; presents students values, ethical standards of the profession. Prerequisite: SW 310, 311, 315 and admission

SW 406 Social Work Practice II (4)
Prepares students for generalist social work practice involving task groups, organizations, communities. Focus on critical thinking about clients in context of larger environment; analyzing relevant interactions within groups, organizations, communities; analyzing operation of groups from political, economic, social perspectives. Examines issues of discrimination, social injustice, institutional racism. Prerequisite: SW 405 and approval of program director. Corequisite: SW 432, 433.

SW 430 Social Work Internship I
(4)
Field placement in a social service agency in which students are supervised by professional social workers. Students learn how to handle process notes, develop interviewing skills, investigate community resources, and interpret agency policies. Prerequisite: SW 311 and approval of program director. Corequisite: SW 405, 431.

SW 431 Social Work Seminar I (2)
Students present and analyze field experiences to develop capacity for self-awareness; development and appropriate application of social work knowledge, values, skills. Review of helping process, generalist practice, theoretical foundations. Prepares students to work with diverse and at-risk clients. Lays foundation for continuing professional development. Weekly seminar accompanies first-semester internship. Prerequisite: SW 311 and approval of program director. Corequisite: SW 405, 430.

SW 432 Social Work Internship II (4)
Second field placement in a social service agency in which students are supervised by professional social workers. Students learn how to handle process notes, develop interviewing skills, investigate community resources, and interpret agency policies. Prerequisite: SW 405, 430 and approval of program director. Corequisite: SW 406, 433.

SW 433 Social Work Seminar II (2)
Weekly seminar held in conjunction with second semester of the social work internship. Students analyze field experiences to further enhance self-awareness, and the development and appropriate application of social work knowledge, values and skills in practice. Capstone course in which students complete a major integrative paper and portfolio. Satisfies the university general education requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Prerequisite: SW 405, 431 and approval of program director. Corequisite: SW 406, 432.


Sociology Courses

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology (4)

Introduction to the basic concepts of sociology relating to the study of people as participants in group life. Particular attention is given to culture, socialization and self development, social class, and major social institutions. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity.

SOC 190 Current Issues in Sociology (4)
Designed for the general student, this course will examine issues of current interest in sociology. The topic will be announced at the time of the offering.

SOC 202 Introduction to Methods of Social Research (4)
The collection, organization, analysis and interpretation of social data; elementary techniques of understanding and using quantitative evidence in sociological research. Prerequisite: SOC 100.

SOC 203 Social Statistics with Computer Applications (4)
Introduction to social statistics emphasizing statistics and data analysis with the aid of computer-based statistical applications. Familiarizes students with the logic of behavioral statistics, and the computation and interpretation of statistical analysis. Prerequisite: SOC 100, 202.

SOC 205 Current Social Problems (4)
Presents sociological approaches to analyzing social problems. Particular attention is given to evaluation of the causes and consequences of social problems, as well as of their proposed solutions.

SOC 206 Self and Society (4)
Examines the reciprocal relationship between the individual and the group. Emphasizes the social roots of human nature, the self, social interaction, definitions of reality, socialization and social character. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area.

SOC 207 Human Sexuality
(4)
Examines human sexuality from a societal and interpersonal context. Includes methodological and conceptual issues in the study of sexuality; socialization and control of sexuality; sexuality as a social process; the influence of culture, race and gender; and the social aspects of biological issues. Identical with WGS 207. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 206.

SOC 210 Introduction to Social Work (4)
Study of the social work profession and the social context of welfare policies; the relationships between social structure and the development of social work practice; and public and private welfare organizations. Identical with SW 210. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or two courses in psychology or human resource development.

SOC 222 Sociology of Mental Illness (4)
Examines social aspects of mental illness, such as impact of social inequalities, role of life stressors and supports, structures of confinement, self-help and human rights movements, narratives of experiences, trends of response to difference and distress. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 240 Sociology of Crime and Punishment (4)
An introduction to the study of crime and the system of criminal justice in the United States. Provides an overview of different theories of crime, the production of crime statistics, types of offenses, the role of the police, courts and correctional agencies, and public policy. Also includes a comparison of street crime with white-collar crime. Required of all students in the criminal justice concentration.

SOC 300 Alcohol, Drugs and Society
(4)
An overview of the sociology of substance use and abuse. Includes a review of sociological perspectives, social control of alcohol and drugs, descriptions of alcohol/drug behavior and treatment programs. Also explores ways in which substance abuse problems can be addressed by policy makers, health care professionals and practitioners in the field of substance abuse. Identical with CRJ 300. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 301 Social Stratification (4)
The concepts of class, caste and race in relation to social conflict and social integration. Students will study these problems in a cross-cultural perspective, emphasizing comparative materials. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 305 Sociology of Religion (4)
An analysis of the social components of religious experience, meaning and behavior; emphasis on the relationship between organized religions and other social institutions and such processes as conversion, commitment, sectarianism, accommodation and secularization. Identical with REL 305. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205

SOC 308 Population Dynamics (4)
Historical analysis of world population growth, focusing on relationships among population size, population policy, and social and economic development. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 315 Social Welfare Policies (4)
Survey of the development of social welfare programs in the U.S. and internationally. Issues related to the problems of poverty, policy analysis and program evaluation related to social welfare in the U.S. and other countries are examined. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Identical with SW 315. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or SOC/SW 210.

SOC 316 Theory and Practice of Social Work (4)
Provide a conceptual framework for the practice of social work in diverse client settings while preparing students with necessary skills for internship placements. Prerequisite: SOC/SW 210.

SOC 320 Law and Society (4)
Explores the concept of law and its expression in different societies and cultural contexts. The comparative development of legal institutions is studied in relationship to social structure. The organization of the legal system and profession is studied as related to the capacity of the law to affect behavior as an instrument of social control. Identical with AN 320. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205 or AN 102.

SOC 323 Juvenile Delinquency and its Social Control
(4)
Nature and types of juvenile delinquency, the relation of juvenile delinquency to the stress of adolescence and the specific social situation, methods of preventing delinquency or its recurrence. Identical with CRJ 323. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 325  Corrections & Rehabilitative Institutions (4)
Overview of prison and correctional systems in the United States. Includes reviews of the historical development of corrections and current issues in corrections, including sentencing practices, overcrowding, race relations, budget constraints, AIDS and substance abuse. Explores ways in which these problems are addressed by criminal justice practitioners. Identical with CRJ 325. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

SOC 326 Family and Community Processes (4)
Introduction to theories, methods and research on community sociology. Emphasis on prevention and intervention in the community setting. Provides conceptual foundation of the field with an overview of the integration of theory, research and practice in individual, family and community processes. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 327 Police and Society (4)
A study of police techniques and problems, of deviant citizen-police relations, and of social control in a field where power is high and visibility is relatively low. Topics include the defenses against corruption and the containment concept of police. Identical with CRJ 327. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 328 Sociology of Health and Medicine (4)
The sociological study of medicine and the uses of sociology in medicine, definitions of health and illness, disease and death, health care occupations, medical malpractice, the organization of health services and trends in health and medicine. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.
SOC 329 Criminal Law & the Courts (4)
Overview of the criminal law and sentencing within the U.S. criminal justice system. Focuses on criminal law and procedures as it relates to the processing of criminal offenders by the courts. The roles of judges, court officers, jury and attorneys are described and analyzed in the context of their professional matrix. Identical with CRJ 329. Prerequisite: CRJ 100.

SOC 330 The Sociology of Deviance (4)
An overview of the sociology of deviance, including theoretical approaches, the social construction of deviance, and contemporary empirical research. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 331 Racial and Ethnic Relations (4)
A study of racial, ethnic and religious groups, particularly those of the U.S., emphasizing their historical development, problems of adjustment and assimilation and contemporary problems and trends. Identical with AN 331. Satisfies the university general education requirement in U.S. diversity. Satisfies the university general education requirement in the knowledge applications integration area. Prerequisite for knowledge applications integration: completion of the general education requirement in the social science knowledge exploration area. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205 or AN 102.

SOC 335 The Family (4)
A comparative and historical study of the family. Identical with WGS 335. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 336 Sociology of Gender (4)
The social construction of femininity and masculinity through social interaction and social institutions. Focus on education, family, media, politics, economy and sport. Identical with WGS 336. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 337 Interpersonal Relationships (4)
Focuses on interdisciplinary research of social and personal relationships, concentrating on how scholars investigate relational phenomena; the development, maintenance and dissolution of relationships; relational or couple processes; and influences of networks, norms, gender, ethnicity and social structure. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 206.

SOC 344 Social Movements (4)
Examines the theoretical and empirical aspects of the origins, mobilization, organization, development and decline of social movements. Will focus on American, international and global social movements. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 345 Urban Sociology (4)
The social structure, culture and ecology of early and contemporary urban communities; institutional responses to the problems of modern urban life. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205. SOC 346 Communities (4) Focuses on the forms and functions of local communities, including neighborhoods and social networks. Both theoretical and applied implications of these structures for community organization and development are explored. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 352 Women and Work (4)
A sociological study of women's domestic and labor market activity in historical context, with emphasis on understanding the causes and consequences of sex segregation. Identical with WGS 352. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or WGS 200.

SOC 371 Forms and Effects of Mass Communication
(4)
Techniques of disseminating ideas and information through the mass media; evaluation of the effect of mass media on values of individuals and policies of institutions. Identical with COM 371. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or sophomore standing.

SOC 373 Social Control of Mass Media (4)
The major sociological factors that control the informational content of the mass media; differences between the structures and processes of control in the print and electronic sectors of the media. Identical with COM 373. Prerequisite: SOC 371.

SOC 376 Language and Society (4)
Identical with ALS 376.

SOC 381 Theories of Modern Organizations (4)
Emphasizes degree to which modern society is based upon formal organization. Topics include: theories of human organization, as well as the study of bureaucracies, features of organizations and the effects of organization on American culture. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 392 Current Problems in Sociology
(4)
Seminar in which a topic is studied in depth. Each seminar requires independent readings and writing. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle for up to 8 credits. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 395 Special Topics in Sociology (4)
Study of a special topic for which no regular course offerings currently exist. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle. May be used for approved course work taken during study abroad. Prerequisite: sociology major or permission of instructor.

SOC 399 Field Experience in Sociology
(4)
Field experience in sociology with faculty supervision. An academic project related to the departmental discipline that incorporates student performance in an occupational setting. May not be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing; 16 credits in sociology, of which at least 8 must be at the 300/400 level, and permission of the instructor. Major theoretical foundations of sociology including conceptual contributions of both classic and contemporary theorists. Satisfies the university requirement for the capstone experience. Satisfies the university general education requirement for a writing intensive course in the major. Prerequisite for writing intensive: completion of the university writing foundation requirement. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 402 Small Groups (4)
The study of small group relations and the informal understandings, codes and conventions that they generate. Considers dynamics of individuality, leadership, conformity and esprit de corps in a group setting. Identical with COM 402. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 460 Political Sociology (4)
Sociological factors that influence distribution of power within a society: political communication, maintenance of political consensus, the revolution process, the structure of political parties and the emergence of new states. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 465 Sociological Perspectives on Aging (4)
Recent sociological perspectives on aging: topics include status of persons approaching and past retirement age, family and community roles and relations, and occupational and political participation. Prerequisite: SOC 100 or 205.

SOC 480 Independent Study and Research (2 or 4)
Directed individual reading and research. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

SOC 497 Apprentice College Teaching (2 or 4)
Supervised participation in teaching an undergraduate course in sociology, combined with readings and discussion of teaching objectives and methods appropriate for sociological presentation. May be taken only once for credit toward a major. Prerequisite: senior sociology major and permission of instructor.




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