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Mary K. Lose, Ed.D.

Associate Professor
Director, Reading Recovery Center of Michigan

Research interests:

Mary K. Lose, Ed.D.,
is Associate Professor in the Department of Reading and Language Arts and Director of the Reading Recovery Center of Michigan at Oakland University (OU). Dr. Lose is also Principal Investigator at Oakland University on the Investing in Innovation (i3) federal grant to scale up Reading Recovery in the United States in collaboration with The Ohio State University and 19 partner universities. Mary also serves as Editor of the Research Section for The Journal of Reading Recovery. Mary’s research interests focus on dissemination and implementation of early literacy intervention policies, teachers’ professional development, and contingent teaching. She has published in professional journals including Principal, Reading Research Quarterly, Teaching PreK – 8, The Clearinghouse, The Elementary School Journal, The Reading Teacher, and The Journal of Reading Recovery. Her article, “A child’s ‘Response to Intervention’ requires a responsive teacher of reading” was reprinted in two books published in 2010 by the International Reading Association. In 2002, Mary was a Fellow of the Marie Clay Literacy Trust, observing teaching and learning in New Zealand Schools. She finds working with teachers and their students among the most interesting and rewarding work of all.

Past research activities/experiences:

  • Reading Recovery: An evidence-based intervention in support of Michigan children, teachers, and schools. (Co-Principal Investigator)
  • The effect of teacher-student ratio on literacy achievement outcomes in preventative early intervention services. (Co-Principal Investigator)
  • Status outcomes in Reading Recovery for children who present low repertoires in fall of first grade. (Principal Investigator)
  • It takes two to tutor: Reading Recovery teachers’ contingent teaching during writing in the Reading Recovery lesson. (Principal Investigator)
  • Follow-up study of Michigan Reading Recovery using growth curve analysis. (Co-Principal Investigator)

Current research activities:

  • Exploring technology innovations in Reading Recovery teacher training (Principal Investigator)
  • Reading Recovery: Scaling up what works, United States Department of Education Investing in Innovation (i3) grant. (Principal Investigator, Oakland University, in partnership with The Ohio State University)

Research goals/plans for future projects:

Examination of the Observation Survey of Early Literacy Achievement Total Score for Reading Recovery Student Selection Purposes (Co-Principal Investigator)

Selected Publications:

  • Schwartz, R. M., Schmitt, M. C. & Lose, M. K. (2012). Effects of teacher-student ratio in response to intervention approaches. The Elementary School Journal, 112 (5), 547-567.
  • Lose, M. K. & Best, D. (2011). Implementing RTI and staffing Reading Recovery in difficult economic times. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 11 (1), 31-38.
  • Lose, M. K. A child’s ‘Response to Intervention’ requires a responsive teacher of reading. In R. A. Allington, Ed. (2010). Essential Readings on Struggling Learners. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. [Originally published in 2007 in The Reading Teacher].
  • Lose, M. K. A child’s ‘Response to Intervention’ requires a responsive teacher of reading. In P. H. Johnston, Ed. (2010). RTI in Literacy: Responsive and Comprehensive. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. [Originally published in 2007 in The Reading Teacher].
  • Lose, M. K. Applying Wood’s levels of contingent support for learning in Reading Recovery. In Inspiration for Professional Development: The Journal of Reading Recovery Special Collections, Volume 2, 2010. [Originally published in 2007 in The Journal of Reading Recovery].
  • Lose, M. K., Schmitt, M. E., Gomez-Bellenge, F. X., Jones, N. K., Honchell, B.A., & Askew, B. J. Reading Recovery and IDEA legislation: Early Intervening Services (EIS) and Response to Intervention (RTI). In Inspiration for Professional Development: The Journal of Reading Recovery Special Collections, Volume 2, 2010. [Originally published in 2007 in The Journal of Reading Recovery].
  • Konstantellou, E. & Lose, M. K. (2009). The promise of Clay’s theory of literacy processing: Training Literacy Lessons intervention specialists. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 9 (1), 5-17.
  • Lose, M. K. (2008). Using RTI to support struggling learners. Principal Magazine, 87 (3), 20-23.
  • Lose, M. K. (2008). Beyond the words: Considering nonverbal communication in Reading Recovery teaching. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 7 (2), 5-17.
  • Lose, M. K. (2008). Assessing my teaching, sustaining my learners. Michigan Reading Journal, 40 (3), 43-45.
  • Lose, M.K. & Konstantellou, E. Selection of students for Reading Recovery: Challenges and responses. In Inspiration for Professional Development: The Journal of Reading Recovery Special Collections, Volume 1, 2008. [Originally published in 2005 in The Journal of Reading Recovery].
  • Lose, M. K. (2007). A child’s ‘Response to Intervention’ requires a responsive teacher of reading. The Reading Teacher, 61(3), 276-279.
  • Lose, M. K. (2007). Marie Clay: Leaving the world a better place for young literacy learners and their teachers. Michigan Reading Journal, 40 (1), 48-49.
  • Lose, M. K. (2007). Remembering Marie. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 7 (1), 15.
  • Lose, M. K. (2007). Applying Wood’s levels of contingent support for learning in Reading Recovery. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 6 (2), 17-30.
  • Lose, M. K., Schmitt, M. E., Gomez-Bellenge, F. X., Jones, N. K., Honchell, B.A., & Askew, B. J. (2007). Reading Recovery and IDEA legislation: Early Intervening Services (EIS) and Response to Intervention (RTI). The Journal of Reading Recovery, 6 (2), 44-49.
  • McEneaney, J., Lose, M. K., & Schwartz, R. M. (2006). A transactional perspective on reading difficulties and response to intervention. New Directions in Research: Reading Research Quarterly, 41 (1), 117-128.
  • Lose, M.K. & Konstantellou, E. (2005). Selection of students for Reading Recovery: Challenges and responses. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 5 (1), 32-45.
  • Lose, M. K. (2005). Valuing expert teacher decision-making. Michigan Journal of Teacher Education, 2 (2), 7-12.
  • Lose, M. K. (2005). Reading Recovery: The optimal response to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act of 2004. The Journal of Reading Recovery, 4 (3), 35-37.
  • Lose, M. K. (2005). Teacher decision-making or labeling? No contest. Michigan Reading Journal, 37 (3), 26-28.
  • Lose, M. K. (2003). Complementary and comprehensive: Reading Recovery and Michigan’s Reading First plan. Michigan Reading Journal. 35 (4), 43-51.
  • Lose, M. K. (2001). Why do a follow-up study of Reading Recovery children: Rationales and recommendations. The Journal of Reading Recovery. 1 (1), 30-35.
  • Lose, M. K. (1997). The teacher, the skater, and the pink shoes. Teaching pre K-8, 28 (3), 48-49.
  • Lose, M. K. (1996). Interprofessional connections: The University of Iowa College of Medicine. The Chalkboard: Newsletter of the Iowa Association of Teacher Educators 3 (1), Cedar Falls, IA: University of Northern Iowa, p. 3.
  • Lose, M. K. (1991). Teachers and the golden years of childhood. The Clearing House, 64, (3), 157-158.
  • Lose, M. K. (1986). A mouse is like a moving mud clod. The Clearing House, 59 (9), 416-418.
Workshops, In-Service Institutes, and Community Events:
  • Beyond words: Making a difference to student learning through nonverbal communication in pre-K and primary grades settings. 
  • A child’s ‘Response to Intervention’ requires a responsive teacher of reading. 
  • Responsive teaching in support of children’s strategic processing in reading and writing
  • Teacher decision-making or labeling (children)? No contest.
  • Powerful language interactions in support of a strong literacy processing system.
Alternatively, together we can discuss a topic of your choice related to literacy teaching and learning, struggling literacy learners, teacher development, or Reading Recovery. For more information or to arrange a time to discuss your interests, please email lose@oakland.edu.


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