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The Honors College

Oak View Hall, Room 210
509 Meadow Brook Road
Rochester, MI 48309-4452
(location map)
(248) 370-4450
Fax: (248) 370-4479

The Honors College

Oak View Hall, Room 210
509 Meadow Brook Road
Rochester, MI 48309-4452
(location map)
(248) 370-4450
Fax: (248) 370-4479

Three students seated at a table with notebooks and pens

Curriculum

The Honors College (HC) curriculum offers a distinctive undergraduate experience that integrates the arts, sciences and professional fields. Students are required to take HC 1000, plus three of The HC core courses that take the place of OU general education courses.

*Honors College students majoring in a department in the College of Arts and Sciences are exempt from the College of Arts and Sciences College Exploratory requirements. (See undergraduate catalog under College of Arts and Sciences.)

Summer 2019

HC 2020 Ethics, Technology, & Literature: Examining A Brave New World in Black Mirror
Instructor: Susan Beckwith
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T/TH 1:00-2:15 pm
Term: Summer 2019
Course Description: From Frankenstein to Philip K. Dick, we’ve been freaked out by new technologies: but is it science or ourselves that scare us? Black Mirror explores our interactions with medicine/technology and with each other and raises ethical/philosophical questions about our advancements as we engineer our world that follow us as we carry them in our pockets and ‘Snap’ our secrets. In this course we’ll examine the ethics, philosophy, and science of new technologies as presented in literature and culture. Ultimately, students will consider how the innovations they’ll ultimately pursue in their own fields may raise similar questions—and how ethically, philosophically, and creatively we’re required to regard their potential and possible pitfalls in order to avoid them being potentially harmful to the persons utilizing them…

HC-2050 Tudors of England
Instructor: Randall Engle
Gen Ed: Global Perspective
Course Time: T/TH 8:30-11:50 am
Term: Summer 2019
Course Description: The Tudor sixteenth century is one of the most fascinating yet challenging periods in English history, even as it was England’s most formative.  This course will survey the events that brought the Tudors to the throne, and England out of the medieval period and into the early modern world.  The first half of the course, a Summer 1 offering on campus, provides historical background of the Tudors to enable an understanding and analyzation of the cultural development of England.  The second portion of this course, two weeks in England, is designed to provide a vivid travel experience that immerses the students in English culture and landmarks.  In London, the class stays in apartments at a central location in Kensington.  With Kensington as home base, the class is within walking distance from tube stations and thus in close proximity to all things Tudor.  Surf to ouinlondon.com for detailed information.

HC 2060 Introduction to Media Literacy
Instructor: Lauren Rinke
Gen Ed: Social Science + Writing Intensive/U.S. Diversity
Course Time: T/TH 8:30-11:50 am
Term: Summer 2019
Course Description:This course in Media Literacy is designed to help students create an informed and critical understanding of the media forms they encounter on a daily basis. Students will examine various forms of mass media including television, film, video games, music lyrics, advertisements and music videos. Students will engage with American media from the 1960s to present day. Students will interpret and evaluate the messages presented in various media forms, and the potential political, societal and cultural implications. They will have an opportunity to work on a variety of collaborative and independent projects including research essays, multimedia presentations and discussions.

Fall 2019 Core Courses

Arts

HC- 2010 Hallelujah! The Music of Handel
Instructor: Randall Engle
Gen Ed: Art OR Knowledge Application
Course Time: M,W,F 12:00-1:07 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: The music of most Baroque composers fell out of fashion soon after their deaths; but Handel remained continuously—and in England, increasingly—popular throughout the centuries.  What about his music is so universally appealing and enduring?  This course will explore all things Handelian (his story, his music, his context) and then focus specifically on his magnum opus work, "Messiah."  The course will include lectures, short papers, class presentations, and attendance at a live performance of "Messiah" with a post-concert reception with the artists.


HC-2010 Seduction in German Cinema
Instructor: Robert Mottram
Gen Ed:  Art & U.S. Diversity
Course Time: M,W,F 1:20 - 2:27 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: This course examines a wide selection of films from the history of German cinema with an eye to the techniques whereby they seduce us as viewers. Our task will be to develop both an art of seeing film (as an art that attempts to spare cinemagoers the experience of being seen) and a critical attunement to the role of the cinema in public as well as private life. Through close analysis of the form and content of canonical German films, we will interrogate the many aberrations of what is euphemistically called “the magic of cinema.” Beginning in the Weimar period with films from Murnau, von Sternberg and Riefenstahl, then jumping to the New German Cinema of Herzog and Fassbinder, and concluding with works by Wenders and Haneke, we will become aware of each film’s means of seduction in the context of the social conditions in which they were made.

HC-2010 Sound Cities: Music, Place, and Urban Landscapes
Instructor: Paul Schauert
Gen Ed:  Art +  Writing Intensive
Course Time: TH 6:30-9:50pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description:  Cities sing, speak, and sound. Whether it’s the Red Hot Chili Peppers’ “Out in L.A.,” NWA’s“Straight Outta Compton,” Jay-Z’s “Empire State of Mind,” Eminem’s “8 Mile,” or The Clash’s“London Calling,” songs can tell stories of cities and their people. The character and soundscapeof a city can profoundly shape the music produced there; in turn, music can transform urbanspaces into sites of social and political action. From Detroit’s Motown, Memphis’ Soultown, andLos Angeles’ Sound City Studios, to London’s blues revival, Tokyo’s City Pop, Paris’ gypsy jazz,and beyond, this class will examine the unique personalities of global cities and the ways inwhich they have given rise to music in particular times and places. How do musicians sonicallyexpress their urban environments and lifestyles? How do they address the problems andconcerns of a city’s denizens? For example, how has music responded to urban renewalprojects, gentrification, and social unrest in particular places at specific moments? How is musicinstrumental for place-making and community building? And, how do the architectures andgeographies of a place shape sounds and the lives of artists and audiences? Using Detroit as aninitial case study, this course will move into global territory, engaging interdisciplinary criticaland comparative examinations of how music serves as expressions and catalysts for urbantransformations around the world.

Literature

HC-2020 Dissenting Voices
Instructor: Carol Hart
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 10:00-11:47 am
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: Repressive regimes have long sought, and continue to seek, to quiet the voices of their critics. Yet, the works continue to come out, maybe not at home, maybe not right away, but the voices of dissenters in society refuse to go away. This class will engage with texts from a variety of eras, regimes, and cultures. We will read the protests of men and women, gay and straight, religious and secular asserting their rights to live freely. We will read both literary and nonfiction texts, poetry and prose. We will work to determine what gives the literature of dissent its power and poignancy. Texts will be viewed in their historical and cultural contexts. Selected authors include Shalamov, Nafisi, Douglass, Baldwin, Havel, Jin, and Marquez.

HC-2020 Superheroes, Magicians, and Misfits: Fighting Bad Guys with Magical Realism
Instructor: Doris Plantus
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: M, W, F 9:20-10:27 am
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description:This class offers an interdisciplinary approach to studying the genre of narrative fiction known as magical realism, specifically as a way of re-examining major historical events. We will read a brilliant account of the comic book industry through the fictional protagonist of a young magician fleeing Prague. Once in America, he takes on the persona of a superhero as a reaction to Nazism. Kavalier and Klay tells of extraordinary human adventures against the historical backdrop of the world of comic book Superheroes. We will also read The Yiddish Policeman’s Union, whose setting is an alternate history of displaced Jews during World War II. Lost to history was a proposal in Congress to allow the temporary rescue of 2 million Jews to a strip of land in Alaska. Long before David Benioff wrote Game of Thrones he wrote a fictional story called City of Thieves that takes place during the infamous 900-day siege of Stalingrad, where our heroes must defy the Einsatzgruppen to locate 12 eggs for a Russian general’s wedding. Finally, in Birds without Wings we track a diverse group of characters who learned to coexist under the Ottoman empire, and suddenly at odds with the rise of the Modern Turkish State. Greeks, Turks, and Armenians become the immediate casualties of the collapse of the Ottoman Empire, with English and Australians 

HC-2020 American Romance
Instructor: Christopher Apap
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: Th6:30-9:50pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote in the preface to The House of Seven Gables that he saw romance as a genre fundamentally different than realistic fiction; instead of dealing with probable events, romance deviated from other novels because it dealt with the “truth of the human heart.” Since that time, critics have used his definition as a lens through which to read early novels in the United States.  We will use early modern definitions of the romance genre to set the stage and then study a series of early American novelists to see how they develop the genre alongside the development of American literary identity.  The course will conclude with the study of Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, which might be effectively understood as his critique of the idea of romance and the audience’s expectations of it.  Other authors studied will likely include Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, Catharine Maria Sedgwick, William Gilmore Simms, and William Wells Brown.

HC-2020 Clues, Crimes & Sleuths: Detective Fiction on Both Sides of the Pond
Instructor: Rebecca Josephy
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: M,W,F 1:20-2:27
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: From its inception, detective fiction has been obsessed with France. E.T.A. Hoffmann’s Mlle de Scudéri is set in 17th century Paris, Poe’s “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” also takes place in Paris and his detective hero, Dupin, is French, and Conan Doyle makes references to France in no less than 27 of the Sherlock Holmes mysteries. Conversely, French writers poke fun at their English and American counterparts. Alexandre Dumas wrote a pastiche of Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue”. The famous French detective fiction writer, Maurice Leblanc titled one of his earliest works Arsène Lupin vs. Herlock Sholmès.

Over the course of the semester, we will explore this va-et-vient between Anglophone and Francophone detective fiction. We will also study a wide range of detective stories from both the American and European continents: from early detective fiction to Golden Age detective fiction to the grittier hardboiled genre.

Western Civilization

HC-2040 Procrastination & Productivity: How "Putting it Off" Can be a Plus (aka "A Nap for Success")
Instructor: Susan Beckwith
Gen Ed: Western Civilization + Writing Intensity
Course Time: M,W, F 12:00-1:07 
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: Can taking a nap be good for your grade point? What is work? From “OMG-is-that-a-kitten?!?!” to “Get-‘er-Done,” we have contradictory impulses and calls upon our time. Our society tells us we should always be productive, but is this a drain on our creativity? da Vinci was known for getting ‘lost in the clouds’ and not getting down to business. Darwin got, well, distracted. A lot. 19th-Century authors, like Hardy, integrate work/workers into their novels, though reading is a ‘leisurely’ activity: and scholars, like Scarry, tackle the perception of productivity and the representation of labor in art/literature to give us insight into the necessity of leisure for laborers. The perception of work varies across the globe and history: different cultures approach work differently, offer more time off, achieve more productivity, and report greater life satisfaction.In class, we’ll consider how ‘work’ works around the world and how mental vacations can lead to inspiration!

HC-2040 Modern European Revolutions
Instructor: Ian Greenspan
Gen Ed: Western Civilization + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, TH 5:30-7:17 pm 
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: a wide range of revolutionary upheavals that will allow for not only an excellent coverage of the phenomenon through time, but also provide several opportunities for comparison in terms of causation, ideology and outcomes.  Furthermore historical context, the worldview of central individuals, and possible tensions and conflicts within the revolutionary movement will come under consideration.  Probable revolutions include: the English Civil War, the Glorious Revolution of 1688, the French Revolution, the Revolutions of 1830 and 1848, the Russian Revolutions of 1905 and 1917, etc. (The German Peasant Revolt of 1524-25 and the Dutch revolt of the 16th and 17th century, Pugachev's Rebellion of 1773-1775, the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising of 1943 could be added as well, though the previous list provides plenty of material).

Global Perspective

HC-2050 Profiles in Power: Biography in World History
Instructor: Ian Greenspan
Gen Ed: Global Perspective + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, TH 10:00-11:47 pm 
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: This course will cover a range of significant historical figures from the ancient world to the modern, from the Near East, to Asia, to Africa, Europe and the U.S.  Balance will be devoted to considerations of influential women and men, as well as individuals who might possibly be less known by the average student but equally as important our understandings of personality, power and global interconnectedness.  While biographical approaches will inform much of our reading, we will also include competing scholarly perspectives on impact/legacy.  Examples of likely historical figures include: Nefertiti, Alexander the Great, Genghis Khan, Elizabeth I/Joan of Arc, Napoleon, Malcolm X, Eva Peron/Indira Gandhi, Nelson Mandela.

HC-2050 Coffee and Conversation
Instructor: Roberta Michel
Gen Ed: Global Perspective + U.S. Diversity
Course Time: T,TH 3:00-4:47 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: Coffee and Conversation introduces students to the global environment of coffee use--from ancient times to current. The course focuses on how differences in economic systems, national culture, sociodemographics, and political orientations affect the use of "coffee". Students will have opportunites to taste products from global settings and recognize how different political, environmental as well as social constructs influence the purchasing and use habits of people. Field trips to various coffee houses as well as to a roastery will take place.

Social Sciences

HC-2060 A Post-Apocalyptic Terms & Conditions Agreement? The Walking Dead, Zombies, Sci-Fi, & Theory
Instructor: Susan Beckwith
Gen Ed: Social Sciences + Writing Intensive
Course Time: TH 5:00-8:20 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: According to Social Contract Theory our morals, actions, and interactions—as individuals and groups—are shaped by and dependent upon an agreement among us to form the society in which we live: but what happens when the un-dead are introduced into that world? What happens to Age of Enlightenment ideas in a post-apocalyptic world?

In this course, we’ll consider how texts like The Walking Dead, set in a world with zombies and survivors, force us to confront the terms and conditions none of us ever clicked ‘I agree’ to…. And since philosophers don’t even all agree on the genesis or foundation of the social contract, we’ll also consider Science Fiction texts that aim their tractor beam at these theorists/theories by examining the effect of new technologies on individuals and society….

Beam me up Scotty, there are Stranger Things in this Westworld, and I don’t want to be TARDIS for this class….

HC-2060 Improving Life with Improv
Instructor: Sean Moore
Gen Ed: Social Sciences
Course Time: T, Th 10:00-11:47 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: This course would teach students the art of improv, and how learning the skills can benefit them in many facets of their life, such as social, educational, and professional. Improvisation is an art form, a fun way of traveling on the journey to self-actualization and feeling comfortable in one's own skin. Improv is a wonderful vehicle for leadership development, whether it's self-leadership or leadership of others, as it imparts crucial life skills that every person needs.

Formal Reasoning

HC-2070 Latin Dead or Alive?
Instructor: Carolyn Delia
Gen Ed: Formal Reasoning + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, R 10:00-11:47 am
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: This Latin course emphasizes the prominence of Latin as a basis for a large percentage of the English language. The course focuses on Latin derivatives used in the professions/careers that interest students and provides them with cognitive connections among seemingly varied and specialized terms. Students will explore the impact that Latin has on making sense of every day communication in this “do it yourself’ world. The cultural portion of the course introduces the student to a concept of “Romans Everywhere” and they begin to notice state/flag mottos, slogans, and inscriptions. Learning of the Roman contributions to law, government, architecture, etc., contributes to a student’s feelings of global heritage and connections and make antiquity a part of their personal ancestry.

Natural Science

HC-2080 Nutrition
Instructor: Anita Sommerville
Gen Ed: Natural Science 
Course Time: T 5:30-8:50 pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: This course explores recent trends in food choices and the reasoning behind them including various fad diets that have become prevalent in our society. The course also investigates the claims from "health Experts" about some of these diets as well as some recommended supplements and examines the validity and safety of these claims.

HC-2080 Health, Happiness & Well Being
Instructor: Benjamin Bennett-Carpenter
Gen Ed: Natural Science 
Course Time: T,TH 1:00-3:47pm
Term: Fall 2019
Course Description: What does science say about what it means to be happy and healthy?  And how can one really “be well”?  These are the central questions of this course.  “Health, Happiness, & Well-Being: Interdisciplinary Studies from the Sciences” explores these questions through scientific studies from experts and from investigations students conduct for themselves.  Students in this course develop and test their own hypotheses, conduct research, report their findings, and draw their own conclusions related to health, happiness, and/or well-being.  Students engage in lab/fieldwork research on this topic outside the classroom and through a research project.

Thesis

HC-3900 Research & Scholarship (Formerly Intro to Thesis)
Instructor: Roberta Michel
Course Time: Online
Term: Fall 2019

Winter 2020 Core Courses

Arts

HC-2010 The Greeks-Live
Instructor: Karen Sheridan
Gen Ed: Art
Course Time: T, Th 1:00-2:47pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Passion, Deception, Fate, Hubris, Politics, Revenge, Destruction, Revelation. In 400 BCE, when the Greeks wanted 15,000 people to simultaneously consider these energies in combination—they wrote a play. The playwrights, major plays and the process of making theatre are the focus of The Greeks—Live!

HC-2010 Opera and Drama
Instructor: David Kidger
Gen Ed: Art
Course Time: M, W 3:30-5:17 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: The course explores opera as an artistic form of musical, political, economic and social expression, starting with Monterverdi’s “L’Orfeo,” composed for the northern Italian court in Mantua in 1607, and finishing with Richard Strauss’ “Salome,” based on Oscar Wilde’s 1891 play, and composed for Dresden in 1905. The history of opera is not just about singers and arias, choruses and elaborate stage effects (though these have always been very important to the tradition). Opera itself is inherently political, providing social commentary on its time and its audience, and providing a window to how opera could shape an artistic view of past, present and future events. Reading music is helpful, however, it is not a requirement in any sense for this course. Students will learn critical listening skills as they watch and listen to performances, taking their individual experiences and collaborating in class, and in individual written responses.

HC-2010 Portraits & Selfies: The Presentation of Self Through Art & Object
Instructor: Susan Beckwith
Gen Ed: Art + Writing Intensive
Course Time: M, W, F 12:00-1:07 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: In Brontë’s Villette, Lucy Snowe has the “temerity to gaze with sang-froid at pictures of Cleopatra.” In this class we will consider how the ‘Self’ is constructed through the portraits in stories, the stories in portraits and, yes, Selfies. From Renaissance artists who painted themselves amongst angels in their frescoes to the royals who put the ‘props’ in propaganda in their choice for the objects surrounding themselves in their portraits to, well, #AvocadoToast—pictures have been how we tell the story of our selves. Can an ‘authentic’ Self be captured in a portrait meant for the consumption of others? In this class, we will analyze the art (and the Insta) of depicting the Self through the practice of close readings of portraits and the study of philosophies of Self, Other, and object. And through all this we’ll be creative in considering how ‘image’ impacts our lives and professions….

HC-2010 Creative Adaptation
Instructor: Gania Barlow
Gen Ed: Art + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 8:00-9:47 am
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: The idea that "there is nothing new under the sun" is as old as the Biblical book of Ecclesiastes.  But what do writers and artists gain from retelling or reimagining older characters and stories?  In this course we will explore answers to that question by examining traditions of creative adaptation, reading "original" works alongside literary, visual, musical, and performance-based adaptations of them.  The course will be divided into units that each focus on one central case study of a narrative that is widely adapted, building connections across artistic media as well as across temporal, cultural, racial, and gender lines. Through such diverse, multimedia clusters we will analyze the creative and interpretive work that goes into such adaptations, and how later artists find ways to explore their own identities and cultures through engagement with older works.  Assignments will include both creative and critical responses to course materials.

HC-2010 Sounding Sustainability: Eco-musicology
Instructor: Paul Schauert
Gen Ed: Art + Writing Intensive
Course Time: M 6:30-9:50pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: 

The current environmental crisis is all too well known and felt throughout our world. As scientists and citizens urgently work to find solutions to ensure the sustainability of our planet and its various species, the study of sound and music are a vital part of these efforts. Because sound is a powerful part of the natural world and music is the human organization of it, studying such phenomena via ethno/musicology, sound studies, and ecomusicology offer valuable insights into the environment and humans’ relations to it, including strategies for more sustainable ways of living. Moreover, in the era of ecological activism, music has acted as an expression of, and force for, environmental justice. In all, this seminar-style class will take a global interdisciplinary approach to explore the relationships between sound, music, ecology, and activism through critical inquiry, artistic analysis, and creative production.

This course will be framed by the following questions: What is ecomusicology? What is sound studies? How can these discourses as well as sound and music themselves help us to understand the natural world and humans’ relation to it? How can sound studies, ethno/musicology, ecomusicology, and artistic production help to address current environmental challenges, seeking to build a more sustainable future? How have music and musicians participated in environmental justice? Lastly, what does climate change sound like? And, how can music and ecomusicology help to address its damaging effects?

Literature

HC-2020 This Class is Epic!
Instructor: Gania Barlow
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T,Th 10:00-11:47 am
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This course will take you on an epic journey through the history of epics: heroic stories of Gods, monsters, journeys, battles, and more, which have fueled imaginations from ancient Greece to contemporary movie theaters. The course will track a literary history across the rise and fall of empires in Europe and into the American twentieth century.  We’ll read some of the best-loved epic narratives of western literature (including works such as Homer’s Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, and Dante’s Inferno), as well as more modern responses to the ancient genre (from writers such as Gwendolyn Brooks, H.D., Derek Walcott, and the Coen brothers). As we explore these works, we’ll learn to recognize and analyze the epic’s conventions, as well as to assess how the genre changes as it moves across time and cultures. Assignments will include critical and creative responses to the readings, researched assignments, and group presentations.

HC-2020 19th Century to Netflix & Chill: Binging & the Serial Story
Instructor: Susan Beckwith
Gen Ed: (Literature OR Knowledge Application)+ Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 3:00-4:47 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Streaming might seem to have changed how we consume stories in the 21st-Century, but there are surprising similarities with 19th-Century Serials and how they affected the way stories are told, produced, and distributed—even the stories themselves. Two hundred years ago, people ‘binged’ past ‘episodes’ in ‘volumes,’ anxiously awaiting the publication of the next season of Stranger Things—or the Victorian equivalent of it…. Twenty years ago, people mustered together for ‘Must-See-TV,’ finding out what happened on Friends at the exact same time as their actual friends—much as Victorians gathered when installments of Serials were released, reading them aloud with family. We’ll examine the act of reading/viewing as a means of forming community around a story; we’ll consider the production of stories in terms of the ‘technologies’ that drive distribution; and, we’ll analyze the effect of episodes versus binging on the structure of stories from the perspective of serialization.

HC-2020 Heroes: Whose your Yoda?
Gen Ed: Literature +Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 3:00-4:47 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: We often forget that heroes are not just super sport stars. They can be of mythic proportions as religious figures to the almost forgotten little kid who cannot ever fly a kite. A hero reminds of of both our strengths and weaknesses and then reaches out to help us grow in wisdom and favor with our fellow humans. Exploring the literature that demonstrates the anyways heroes help us become our own heroes offers an adventure that will be life long. Come discover your Yoda that will guide you through your adventure filled life as a result of taking Heroes: Who Is Your Yoda! 

HC-2020 Contemporary LGBTQIA+ Fiction
Instructor: Craig Smith
Gen Ed: Literature + Writing Intensity/US Diversity
Course Time: T, Th 1:00-2:47 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: In exciting and compelling new work, current novelists and short-story writers are exploring the ways that gender and sexual identities are being defined by young people in our time, and the ways that they were defined in the past. In prize-winning recent fiction, readers in this class will travel from African experience in “Under the Udala Trees” to South Asian life in “The Hungry Ghosts.” We will encounter vivid imaginative tales ranging from a re-imagining of classic fantasy in “Peter Darling” to re-awakened history in “The Song of Achilles,” and a coming-of-age romance that has struck a chord with audiences of all ages and identities, “Call Me by Your Name.” Classes will combing informal lectures with small-group discussions and fun writing exercises. Major assignments comprise a shorter essay and a longer essay (students have the option of doing a creative assignment for the latter project).


Western Civilization

HC-2040 The World of Eduardian England
Instructor: Randall Engle
Gen Ed: Western Civilization OR Knowledge Application
Course Time: MWF 12:00-1:07 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: The World of Edwardian England. The PBS series “Downton Abbey";
(re)introduced the world to Edwardian England. At the turn of the century, with a new king on
the throne, England witnessed some of the most sweeping, dramatic changes known to modern
history: suffrage, crumbling socio-economic barriers, radical changes in fashion, new scientific
claims, and a world forever changed by war. This course will explore not only how the world
changed in Edwardian Britain, but also how America was shaped by it. This course studies the
social systems, monarchy and the Church of England of that time—in addition to the foods, the
fashion and the music. Evaluation will be class participation, readings, and an individual project that will be offered as a class presentation. The class will be offered at Meadowbrook Estate,
Oakland's own "Downton Abbey.
 
HC-2040 Anger, Race, Forgiveness
Instructor: Anthony Wiliams
Gen Ed: Western Civilization + Writing Intensive/U.S. Diversity
Course Time: M, W, F 10:40-11:47 am
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This course begins with a cross-cultural analysis of morality and the moral emotions from the standpoint of anthropology and empirical moral psychology. Special attention will be paid to anger and resentment. Secondly, the course focuses on an indictment of Democratic Liberalism and its complicity in European imperialism and African slavery. Despite its ideals of justice, fair competition, and equal rights, for most of its history, American democracy has explicitly denied equal rights and fair competition to people of color. The challenge is to re-conceive democratic liberalism, in light of its actual history, in order to achieve racial justice. Lastly, the course brings questions about the reactive attitudes to bear in both the realm of personal relationships and the realm of political justice. Forgiveness, as prescribed in the Judeo-Christian tradition, will be compared to an alternative, a spirit of generosity, in order to consider the best method of responding to injury.

HC-2040 Consilience in American Religion
Instructor: Benjamin Bennett-Carpenter
Gen Ed: Western Civilization +Writing Intensive/US Diversity
Course Time: T, Th 1:00-1=2:47 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: E pluribus unum.  Many.  And one.  How may we hold two such powerful ideas in mind simultaneously?  This course attempts to engage powerfully unifying ideas within the massive complexity of the lived experience of American religions.  “Consilience in American Religions” explores the idea of “consilience” (i.e., the “unity of knowledge”) within the context of interdisciplinary studies of religions in the United States of America.  Students are introduced to the development of disciplinary and interdisciplinary views on the concept of “consilience” as it developed within Western civilization, with a focus on 19th, 20th, and early 21st century American religions.  Texts include Repko, Szostak, & Buchberger's Introduction to Interdisciplinary Studies (SAGE, 2nd ed., 2017); Bloom’s The American Religion (Chu Hartley, 2006); and E.O. Wilson’s Consilience: The Unity of Knowledge (Vintage, 1998); and among other select texts and films/videos.


Global Perspectives

HC-2050 Historical Narratives in Fiction and Film: The Fall of Constantinople and Sack of Jerusalem
Instructor: Doris Plantus
Gen Ed: Global Perspectives/Project Based
Course Time: T, Th 1:00-2:47 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This course will teach students to understand the differences between historicizing fiction and fictionalizing history, specifically as regards the Siege of Jerusalem by Saladin (1187), and the Fourth Crusade (1204), or Sack of Constantinople. Both Ridley Scott's film "Kingdom of Heaven" and Umberto Eco's fictional novel "Baudolino" exemplify how perceptions are influenced by literature and film to the extent that history is altered in the 21st century mind. We will study Scott's film while reading historical narratives, in order to understand his creative interpretation of Jerusalem's fall to Muslim forces. Similarly we will read Eco's novel against complimentary historical accounts to inform our understanding of his creative interpretation of Constantinople's fall to Christian crusaders of the Latin (western) Church. Given the global issues affecting today's students,  such a course can only enlighten their understanding of how literature and film can illuminate--or sometimes obfuscate--history.

HC-2050 Living in the Shadow of Death
Instructor: Daniel Propson
Gen Ed: Global Perspectives OR Knowledge Application) + Writing Intensive 
Course Time: M, W, F 12:00-1:07 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Every one of us will die one day.  Every action we take as adults is taken in the inescapable shadow of death.  But does this shadow inhibit our development as human beings, or does it somehow enhance our lives?  If science could put an end to death or disease, would that be a good thing?  What, if anything, can be made of the notion of a “good death”? In this class, we will explore these questions, as we investigate what some of the most profound thinkers have said about death in the course of history.  We will consider material from Epicurus, Kierkegaard, Shakespeare, and Tolstoy, to name a few.  We will consider religious approaches to death, and we will explore the notion of an afterlife.  We will share (as students are comfortable) about those we love who have died, and we will likely make a respectful visit to a local cemetery or funeral home in the course of the semester.

HC-2050 Will the EU Survive After Brexit? 
Instructor:Frank Cardimen
Gen Ed: Global Perspective OR Knowledge Application
Course Time: T, TH 10:00-11:47 am
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Knowledge of the EU environments, political systems,economies, societies and religions of one or more regionsoutside the United States and awareness of the transnationalflow of goods, peoples, ideas and values• knowledge about different cultural heritages, past and present,and how they play in forming values in another part of the worldthat are different than in the USA. Travel Component willprovide 11 days in Europe in Hungary and UK.

Social Sciences

HC-2060 Gender Communication
Instructor: Valerie Patricia Palmer-Mehta
Gen Ed: Social Sciences + U.S. Diversity
Course Time: M 5:00-8:20 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Explores the relationships between gender and communication strategies and settings. The course examines how gender is experienced and how individuals learn to manage the dynamic of gender in interpersonal interaction and public discourse.

HC-2060 Food and Cooking in Society
Instructor: Jo Reger
Gen Ed: Social Sciences + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 10:00-11:47
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description:In this course, we will explore the ways in which food and cooking are shaped by class, race, gender and other social categories. We will do this through exploring the preparation of food, the customs around food, the availability of food to differ groups and neighborhoods, among other topics. We will draw on the burgeoning food studies in sociology scholarship as well as interdisciplinary sources from health sciences, anthropology, political science and history. Students will conduct research on food and society.

Formal Reasoning

HC-2070 Logic: It’s just so Logical
Instructor: Carolyn Delia
Gen Ed: Formal Reasoning + Writing Intensive
Course Time: T, Th 10:00-11:47 am
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This is a non-mathematical based introduction to formal logic which
attempts to show that being “logical” is immensely important but only achieved through definite thinking patterns. The course presents the types of logical reasoning, forms, rules, and practical
application of argument formation and evaluation. The text will provide the knowledge base but
the exercises and projects will come from various disciplines/careers and include various types
of logical reasoning from logic puzzles and exam problems to critical reading, argument
formation, panel discussions, and debates. Various fallacies will be explored. Students will be
able to recognize the validity of arguments they encounter in their course work, career work,
advertisements and product/services offers. Students will become more proficient at formulating
arguments for use in their courses, persuasive presentations or writings, and negotiations or
proposals they may need as individuals with a personal life and career professionals.

HC-2070 Introduction to Spacial Analysis
Instructor: Annalie Campos
Gen Ed: Formal Reasoning OR Knowledge Application
Course Time: W 6:30-9:20pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This course introduces students to core concepts, principles, and techniques of spatial analysis using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and other widely-accessible integrated and interactive technologies including GPS tools and web-maps. As students, you will explore what makes spatial information special and learn both the theoretical foundations as well as various applications of spatial analysis necessary for addressing and solving problems of interest to you, your community, and current or future employer. You will learn how spatial data is created, organized and managed, analyzed, mapped in various ways, and how to design maps so you could tell effective stories through them on topics such as travel, migration, conflicts and crime analysis, urban planning, environmental risks, health and health impacts, education, culture, food and food supply chains, transportation, business and management, and socio-spatial inequalities and disparities.


Natural Science

HC-2080 Veganism, Health, and Environment
Instructor: Kelly Maki Michiya
Gen Ed: Natural Science
Course Time: M,W 3:30-5:17 pm
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: This course explores the impact of dietary choice on health and the environment. It examines basic human anatomy andphysiology in relation to nutrition and evaluates the currentsystem of food production and its impact on the ecosystem. This course further considers veganism (or plant-based nutrition) as a viable solution in creating both personal and global health.

HC-2080 Mistrust of Science
Instructor: Barry Winkler
Gen Ed: Natural Science & Writing Intensive
Course Time: T,TH 8:00-9:47
Term: Winter 2020
Course Description: Science is humans' greatest invention. It's the reason you can read this course summary on your computer. It's whyyou stay healthy after getting your flu shot. It's the foundation for what we know about climate change. It can savelives and keep us safe. Yet science is too often ignored or dismissed. This course will consider several of the majorareas of mistrust of science today: 1) while evolution is considered a cornerstone of biology, nearly 40% of Americansbelieve that God created human beings in their present form; 2) despite strong scientific evidence for the potentialdevastating effects of global warming, a segment of the population continues to believe that the planet is not warming,and if it is, then the change is primarily due to nonhuman causes; 3) the medical community has long-provided


Thesis

HC-3900 Introduction to the Thesis
Instructor: Roberta Michel
Course Time: Online
Term: Winter 2020

Independent Study

HC-4900 Independent Study
Instructor: Dr. Harper
Course Time: TBD
Term: Winter 2020

Language

FOREIGN LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT

The Honors College foreign language requirement may be fulfilled by choosing one of the following 4 tracks:

  1. Foreign language proficiency: Completion of, or proficiency in, foreign language courses through level 2150.
  2. Foreign language and cultural experience: Two semesters of the same language on campus in partnership with a study abroad experience of at least 6 weeks in a non-English-speaking country.
  3. Foreign language diversity: Two semesters each of two different languages for a total of four semesters.
  4. American Sign Language: Three semesters of American Sign Language (COM 1500, COM 1501, COM 2500) and ALS 1101.
ASPIRE

HONORS ASPIRE: YEARLY EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING ADVANTAGE

  • Meet with an Honors College Academic Adviser at least once a year for an HC progress plan
  • Attend one Honors College event per year
  • Attend Research and Scholarship Day presentations once per year (fall or winter)
  • Complete community service requirement—10 hours per year of one sustained service
Thesis Info

All HC students must produce an Honors Thesis, ie: independent project of scholarly or creative achievement. Most often, this activity is carried out in the student's major area of study, e.g., biology, English, economics, business, engineering. The student, together with a faculty sponsor/mentor, develops a proposal of the project, submits it to The Honors College Council for approval, and carries out the work.

There is wide latitude regarding the nature of the projects, since it is recognized that substantial differences exist across disciplines. The end result is a written thesis – which could also include a creative performance, dance recital, engineering project, or another type of creative activity. The proposal must be approved by the mentor and The Honors College Council.

*Current students, please see espace for deadlines, forms and details

Thesis Deadlines:

For students graduating in Fall:

  • September 15th- Final Thesis submitted to Mentor for revisions
  • October 15th - Final Revised Thesis (including checklist) submitted to the Honors College

For Students Graduating in Spring:

  • January 15th- Final Thesis submitted to Mentor for revisions
  • February 15th - Final Revised Thesis (including checklist) submitted to The Honors College

For Students Graduating in Summer I:

  • February 15th- Final Thesis submitted to Mentor for revisions
  • March 15th - Final Revised Thesis (including checklist) submitted to the Honors College

For students graduating in Summer II:

  • May 15th - Final Thesis submitted to Mentor for revisions
  • June 15th - Final Revised Thesis (including checklist) submitted to the Honors College