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Joel W. Russell

Joel W. Russell

Title: Professor
Physical Chemistry
Office: 244 Science and Engineering Building
Phone: (248) 370-2086
E-mail: russell@oakland.edu

Degrees
Ph.D., University of California (Berkeley)

Research Interests

Professor Russell's research involves the design, development, and assessment of visualization software to enhance the teaching and learning of chemical concepts. He is the principle author of a software program that allows the synchronized presentation of from one to four different macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic representations of chemical phenomena. Research studies are continuing to explore ways to best use visualization software both in-class and out-of-class to help students overcome chemical misconceptions and master new concepts. These studies include uses of traditional assessment techniques as well as exploration of uses of multimedia testing protocols in regular classes.

A further extension of Professor Russell's research involves integration of conceptual problem solving techniques into a general chemistry textbook and its supporting materials. These include computer assisted learning software, classroom presentation software, and development and uses of conceptual problems for use in-class, out-of-class and on examinations.

Recent Publications

J. W. Russell, R. B. Kozma, D. Becker, and T. Susskind, SMV:Chem: Synchronized Multiple Visualizations of Chemistry,John Wiley & Sons, New York (2000).

J. E. Brady, J. W. Russell, J. R. Holum, Chemistry, Matter and Its Changes, 3rd Ed., John Wiley & Sons, New York (2000).

J. E. Brady and J. W. Russell, Interactive Learningware for General Chemistry, John Wiley & Sons, New York (2000).

R. Kozma, E. Chin, J. Russell, and N. Marx, "The Roles of Representations and Tools in the Chemistry Laboratory and Their Implications for Chemistry Learning", J. Learning Sci., 9(2), 105-143, (2000).

R. Kozma and J. Russell, "Multimedia and understanding: Expert and novice responses to different representations of chemical phenomena", J. Res. Sci. Teaching, 43(9), 949-968, (1997).

J. Russell, R. Kozma, T. Jones, J. Wykoff, N. Marx, and J. Davis, "Use of simultaneous-synchronized macroscopic, microscopic, and symbolic representations to enhance the teachilng and learning of chemical concepts", J. Chem. Ed., 74(3) 330-334, (1997).