School of Business Administration

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Business Research

Business has no boundaries, it is cross-disciplinary. Expert faculty from Oakland’s School of Business Administration have long recognized the importance of examining cross-disciplinary and societal issues through the business lens. Oakland business faculty members consistently publish their research in high-level academic journals on topics that advance the understanding of critical issues. In addition to providing insight to fellow academics, their research offers actionable data for professionals and influences classroom discussions.

Featured Research

Strategic sustainability focus delivers competitive advantages

Ravi Parameswaran, Ph.D. leaning against a railing at the top of a stairway

An analysis by Dr. Ravi Parameswaran, Ph.D., professor of marketing at the Oakland University School of Business Administration, shows how marketing can help organizations strategically transition from environmentally aware to genuinely sustainable by leveraging marketing’s unique dual role within organizations: function and business orientation. View the full story here.

Educating, empowering patients improves health

Ziaodong Deng, Ph.D., in a doctor's office

A recent study by Xiaodong Deng, Ph.D., professor of management information systems at Oakland University’s School of Business Administration, examined how empowering chronic disease sufferers to use information technology could help them better manage their illnesses. View the full story here.

Study examines best leadership styles for entrepreneurial startups

Jae Hyeung Kang, Ph.D. seated in front of a window

In a recent study, assistant professor of entrepreneurship at Oakland University Jae Kang, Ph.D., examined the relationship between CEOs and managers by comparing transformational versus transactional leadership styles. The study focused on relatively small and young organizations that had innovative managers in an entrepreneurial organizational setting. View the full story here.

Money market mastermind decodes industry secrets

Ranadeb Chaudhuri, Ph.D. gesturing with his hands

In a recent study Ranadeb Chaudhuri, PhD, found that the performance of investment products managed by firms where asset managers hold Ph.D.s is superior to that of products managed by similar firms that do not hire Ph.D.s. However, talent trumps training when it comes to the success of Ph.D. money managers. Innate ability matters more than field specific training among asset managers holding a doctorate degree. View the full story here.

Fighting workplace aggression

Caitlin Demsky, Ph.D. in a red jacket in an office

Oakland University assistant professor of management Caitlin Demsky, Ph.D., is studying how workplace aggression, whether physical or psychological, is making employees stressed, sick and unhappy. It’s also spilling over into personal lives, creating work-family conflicts. She offers actions to help to help individuals and organizations address this. View the full story here.

The cost of lower taxes

Timothy Hodge standing on a downtown Detroit street

In his research paper, Timothy Hodge, Ph.D., assistant professor of economics, observes that Neighborhood Enterprise Zone homebuyers do not often reap the financial benefits associated with the program. View the full story here.


Business Research Magazine Fall 2017

Featured Summaries

Oakland University School of Business Administration faculty regularly publish articles in high-quality journals in their areas of expertise. Following is a selection of summaries from articles published in top-tier journals.

Global

Ruihua (Joy) Jiang
Associate Professor of Management
Too Slow or Too Fast? Speed of FDI Expansions, Industry Globalization, and Firm Performance
Firms become multinational through conducting serial foreign direct investments (FDIs). In this publication, we draw on an organizational learning perspective to examine how the speed of FDIs affects firm performance. We argue that firms in general suffer from being either too slow or too fast in their FDI expansions and that the relationship between the speed of FDI expansions (SFEs) and firm performance is best captured by an inverse U-shape. Moreover, the inverse U-shaped relationship varies with the level of globalization pressure in such a way that the inverse U-shaped curve will have a steeper upward and steeper downward curvature for firms operating in global industries than for those in multidomestic industries. Using a panel data set of 1263 Japanese firms’ FDIs from 1986 to 1997, we find strong support for the arguments.

Long Range Planning, Vol. 50, February 2017, pg. 74-92.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.lrp.2016.06.001
Co-authors:
Jane Lu, Professor of Management, University of Melbourne
Jing Yu (Gracy) Yang, Senior Lecturer in International Business, University of Sydney Business School


Kasaundra Tomlin
Associate Professor of Economics
World Trade Organization Sanctions, Implementation, and Retaliation
This is the first empirical paper to investigate the response of shareholders to the application of WTO-authorized trade retaliation. We compare shareholder gains stemming from illegal trade subsidies with the losses generated by subsequent WTO-authorized retaliatory measures. Results indicate that the increase in share returns of U.S. firms receiving subsidies provided by the “Byrd Amendment” far eclipsed the share declines experienced by firms targeted with associated retaliatory tariffs. We believe this lack of response towards retaliation by U.S. firms diminished pressure on U.S. policymakers to strike down the Byrd Amendment, as was mandated by the WTO. Apathy towards retaliation along with associated delays in WTO-compliance by the U.S., may reflect a potential weakness on the part of WTO-authorized retaliation in serving as an effective political counterweight to pro-anti-dumping forces in the U.S.

Empirical Economics, Vol. 48, March 2015, pg. 715-745.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00181-013-0794-2
Co-author:
Benjamin H. Liebman, Professor of Economics, St. Joseph’s University


Janell D. Townsend
Professor of Marketing
Global Brand Architecture Position and Market-Based Performance: The Moderating Role of Culture
Companies expend vast resources to create product and brand portfolios in the global marketplace. Yet knowledge of the market-based performance implications of various positions in a firm’s portfolio architecture is lacking in the literature. To further the understanding of managing brands in the global marketplace, the authors develop a conceptual framework based on the tenets of signaling theory, explore the relationship between global brand architecture and market-based performance, and consider how culture moderates this relationship. The results of the analyses, from a panel data set of 165 automotive brands operating in 65 countries from 2002 to 2008, reveal that global brands perform better in the marketplace than their non-global counterparts. Cultural values indeed provide boundary conditions for this relationship, suggesting that alternative strategies for some markets may be advisable.

Journal of International Marketing, Vol, 23(2), June 2015, pg. 53-72.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1509/jim.13.0164
Co-authors:
Mehmet Berk Talay, Associate Professor of Marketing, University of Massachusetts Lowell
Sengun Yeniyurt, Associate Professor of Marketing, Rutgers University

Economics

Zeina AlSalman
Assistant Professor of Economics
Oil Price Uncertainty and the U.S. Stock Market: Analysis Based on a GARCH-in-Mean VAR Model
This paper uses a bivariate GARCH–inmean VAR model to examine the effect of oil price uncertainty on the U.S. real stock returns at the aggregate and sectoral levels. Estimation results suggest that there is no statistically significant effect of oil price volatility on the U.S. stock returns. The absence of an uncertainty effect might be explained by the fact that companies are likely to hedge against fluctuations in oil prices. It could also stem from the ability of most companies to transfer the higher cost of oil to customers. Moreover, the impulse responses indicate that, accounting for oil price uncertainty, oil price increases and decreases have symmetric effects on the U.S. aggregate stock returns, in that energy price increases and decreases are estimated to have equal and opposite effects on the U.S. financial market. However, this symmetric effect doesn’t hold across all the sectors studied in this paper.

Energy Economics, Vol. 59, September 2016, pg. 251-260.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.eneco.2016.08.015


Zeina AlSalman
Assistant Professor of Economics
Oil Price Shocks and the U.S. Stock Market: Do Sign and Size Matter?
This paper investigates the effect of oil price innovations on the U.S. stock market using a model that nests symmetric and asymmetric responses to positive and negative oil price innovations. It finds no evidence of asymmetry for aggregate stock returns, and only limited evidence for 49 industry-level portfolios. These asymmetries do not match up with conventional views of energy-dependent sectors of the economy. Asymmetries are more likely driven by the effect of oil price innovations on expected and/or realized demand. We ask whether the size of the shock matters, in that doubling the size of the shock more (or less) than doubles the size of the response, finding that the effect of a 2.s.d innovation is about double the magnitude of the impact of a 1.s.d innovation. We find no support for the conjecture that shocks that exceed a threshold have an asymmetric effect on stock returns.

The Energy Journal, Vol. 36(3), 2015.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.5547/01956574.36.3.zals
Co-author:
Ana María Herrera, Professor of Economics, University of Kentucky


Ram Orzach
Associate Professor of Economics
Common-Value All-Pay Auctions with Asymmetric Information and Bid Caps
This paper studies a class of two-player common-value all-pay auctions (contests) with asymmetric information under the assumption that one of the players has an information advantage over his opponent and both players are budget-constrained. We extend the results for all-pay auctions with complete information, and show that in this class of all-pay auctions with asymmetric information, sufficiently high (but still binding) bid caps do not change the players’ expected total effort compared to the benchmark auction without any bid cap. Furthermore, it shows that there are bid caps that increase the players’ expected total effort compared to the benchmark. Finally, it demonstrates that there are bid caps which may have an unanticipated effect on the players’ expected payoffs — one player’s information advantage may turn into a disadvantage as far as his equilibrium payoff is concerned.

International Journal of Game Theory, Vol. 45 (Special Issue: In honor of Abraham Neyman), March 2016, pg. 63-88.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00182-015-0492-8
Co-Authors:
Ezra Einy, Professor of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Ori Haimanko, Lecturer of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Aner Sela, Professor of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev


Ram Orzach
Associate Professor of Economics
Common-Value All-Pay Auctions with Asymmetric Information
All-pay auctions are used in diverse areas of economics, such as lobbying in organizations, R&D races, political contests, promotions in labor markets, trade wars, and biological wars of attrition. This paper studies two-player common-value all-pay auctions (contests) in which the players have ex-ante asymmetric information represented by finite partitions of the set of possible values of winning. The study considers a family of such auctions in which no player has an information advantage over his opponent. We find sufficient conditions for the existence of equilibrium in monotonic strategies for auctions without an information advantage. We further show that the ex-ante distribution of equilibrium effort is the same for every player (and hence the players’ expected efforts are equal), although their expected payoffs are different and they do not have the same ex-ante probability of winning.

International Journal of Game Theory, Vol. 46, March 2017, pg. 79-102.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00182-015-0524-4
Co-authors:
Ezra Einy, Professor of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Mridu Goswami, Economic Research Unit, Indian Statistical Institute
Ori Haimanko, Lecturer of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Aner Sela, Professor of Economics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Finance & Accounting
Sha Zhao
Assistant Professor of Accounting
Bowling Alone, Bowling Together: Is Social Capital Priced in Bank Loans?
We investigate whether the societal-level social capital enjoyed by firms affects the cost of their bank loans. Employing a measure of societal-level social capital for U.S. counties, we find that firms with higher societal-level social capital are associated with lower loan spreads. To further identify causality, we explore two events. Using a sample of firms that relocate their headquarters for tax reasons, we find that firms that move to lower (higher) social capital counties experience a higher (lower) cost of bank loans following relocations. The second event was the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001. After the disaster, social capital in affected counties increased through social capital building efforts. We show that firms headquartered in the affected counties experience significantly lower loan spreads than other firms after the attack. Our findings contribute to the understanding of how societal-level social capital promotes economic development through its impact on financing costs.

Journal of Accounting, Auditing and Finance, August 2017.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1177/0148558X17724890
Co-authors:
C.S. Agnes Cheng, Professor of Accounting, Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Jing Wang, Teaching Assistant, Queen’s University
Ning Zhang, Assistant Professor and Commerce, Queen’s University
Health Care

Miron Stano
Professor of Economics
Insurance, Race/Ethnicity and Sex in the Search for a New Doctor: ACA-Baseline Estimates from an Audit Study
A better understanding of the magnitudes and sources of health disparities remains a major research challenge. We employed simulated patient calls in Summer/Fall 2013 to the offices of a national random sample of primary care physicians to assess appointment availability for white, black, and Hispanic women and men with different types of insurance. This is the first audit study to sample primary care physicians nationally, to examine the effect of race/ ethnicity and sex on access, and to assess appointment offers for Medicare patients. The disparities we found adversely affecting some subgroups of Medicaid patients are much larger than in previous assessments of primary care appointments. These should be a cause for heightened concern among policymakers, and highlight the importance of including race/ethnicity and sex in such research.

Economic Letters, Vol. 137, December 2015, pg. 150-153.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.econlet.2015.11.005
Co-authors:
C Arnab Mitra, Assistant Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Portland State University
Rajiv Sharma, Associate Professor of Economics, Department of Economics, Portland State University


Mohan Tanniru
Professor of Management Information Systems
Designing an Effective Social Media Platform for Health Care with Synchronous Video Communication
Online social networks are evolving as platforms for health communication among the public, patients, and health professionals. Online social media platforms are providing conduits for providers to increase clinical competence of healthcare practitioners through constant monitoring and support mechanisms. Many existing health social network-based portals do not provide synchronous-video-based communication features and are restricted to only text- and picture-based content sharing. Arguably, healthcare-focused online social networks need video based communication for active knowledge sharing between providers and patients, peer-patients, providers and specialists, etc. for sharing disease-related information. This study provides a technological framework and design architecture to develop a customizable online healthcare social media network that can incorporate synchronous video communication capability as one important option for knowledge exchange. The design principles and layers that support different types of functionality are described.

Journal of Information Technology, Vol. 20, 2014.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.5220/0004905204340441
Co-authors:
Young Park, College of Business Administration, Savannah State University
Jiban Khuntia, Assistant Professor of Information Systems, University of Colorado Denver

Information Technology and Security

Yazan Roumani
Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods
Exploring ERP-enabled Technology Adoption: A Real Options Perspective
For decades, practitioners and scholars have focused on achieving optimal values in and benefits from enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Given that scholars have identified ERP systems as having option-like characteristics such as the capacity to create an information technology (IT) platform that enables the adoption of subsequent function-specific applications, we face a need to explore the linkage between post-ERP systems implementation and subsequent ERP-enabled technology adoption. We used real options theory to explore the underlying relationship between the initial ERP system implementation and subsequent technology adoptions. We surveyed 519 IT executives in the United States and found that the level of technology uncertainty, managerial flexibility, and formal real option analysis in ERP adoption decisions influenced the organizational relative advantage of subsequent non-ERP technologies. Our results also reveal that the level of uncertainty had a negative relationship with ERP-enabled technology adoption, while formal real option analysis in ERP adoption decisions positively influenced ERP-enabled adoption.

Communications of the Association for Information Systems, Vol. 39, 2016.
Full paper:https://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol39/iss1/24
Co-authors:
Yaman Roumani, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems, Eastern Michigan University
Joseph K. Nwankpa, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Methods, University of Texas

Yazan Roumani
Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods
Time Series Modeling of Vulnerabilities
A significant share of the security breaches encountered nowadays arises because of vulnerabilities. Given the increasing trend in vulnerabilities and the ever-growing threat of breaches, security’s importance has drastically increased. Vulnerability prediction models forecast future vulnerabilities and can be used to assess security risks and estimate the resources needed for handling potential security breaches. Although several vulnerability prediction models have been proposed, such models have shortcomings and do not consider trend, level, and seasonality components of vulnerabilities. Through time series analysis, this study built predictive models for five popular web browsers: Chrome, Firefox, Internet Explorer, Safari and Opera and for all reported vulnerabilities elsewhere. Results showed that time series models provide a good fit to our vulnerability datasets and can be useful for vulnerability prediction. Results also suggested that the level of the series is the best estimator of the prediction models.

Computers and Security, Vol. 51(1), June 2015, pg. 32-40.
Full paper:https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cose.2015.03.003
Co-authors:
Yaman Roumani, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems, Eastern Michigan University
Joseph K. Nwankpa, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Methods, University of Texas

Yazan Roumani
Assistant Professor of Quantitative Methods
Examining the Relationship Between Firm’s Financial Records and Security Vulnerabilities
Security vulnerabilities and breaches remain a major concern for firms as they cost billions of dollars in downtime, maintenance and disruptions. Although researchers in the fields of security and vulnerability prediction have made significant contributions, the number of vulnerabilities continues to increase. Contrary to existing vulnerability studies, this research examines vulnerabilities from a financial perspective. We explore whether firm’s financial records are associated with vulnerabilities. In particular, we examine the correlation between the number of vulnerabilities and each of firm’s size, financial performance, marketing and sales, and research and development expenditures. The empirical analysis of this study is based on data collected from 89 publicly traded technology firms over a 10-year period. Our results reveal that financial records are significantly associated with vulnerabilities. More specifically, our results show that as technology firms increase their marketing and sales expenditures, the number of vulnerabilities increases as well. Interestingly, the analysis shows that firms can counter this rise by increasing their spending on research and development. We also find a positive correlation between the number of vulnerabilities and each of firm’s size and performance.

International Journal of Information Management, Vol. 36(6), December 2016, pg. 987-994.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2016.05.016
Co-authors:
Yaman Roumani, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems, Eastern Michigan University
Joseph K. Nwankpa, Assistant Professor of Computer Information Systems and Quantitative Methods, University of Texas

Vijayan Sugumaran
Professor of Management Information Systems
Web Personalization for User Acceptance of Technology: An Empirical Investigation of e-Government Services
E-commerce firms have adopted web personalization techniques extensively in the form of recommender systems for influencing user behavior for customer retention. Although there are numerous studies in this area, academic research addressing the role of web personalization in user acceptance of technology is scant. Further, owing to the potential of recommender systems to attract and retain customers, most studies in web personalization have been done in an e-commerce setting. In this research, the ‘Consumer Acceptance and Use of Information Technology’ theory proposed in previous research has been extended to include web personalization as a moderator and has been tested in an e-government context. We conducted a laboratory experiment with the treatment group receiving personalized web forms for requesting an e-government service. Our analyses show that personalizing the Web by self-reference and content relevance has a significant moderator role in influencing the relationship between determinants of intention to use and behavioral intention in certain cases.

Information Systems Frontiers, Vol. 18(3), June 2016, pg. 579-595.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-015-9550-9
Co-authors:
Vinodh Krishnaraju, Department of Management Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Madras
Saji K Mathew, Department of Management Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Madras

Vijayan Sugumaran
Professor of Management Information Systems
John Kim
Professor of Marketing
Unrealized Value of Incentivized eWOM Recommendations
While companies have recognized the perceived economic benefits of encouraging and managing electronic word-of-mouth (eWOM), the benefits may be understated. Companies take into account the influence on the audience. But, what about any effects on the person who communicates the eWOM? We explore the impact that incentivized eWOM has on communicator attitude. Using the “saying is believing” effect as our theoretical foundation, we suggest that providing eWOM induces a change in the communicator’s attitude. By generating and providing a biased recommendation, the communicator will believe the biased recommendation. Furthermore, the communicator is likely to remember the biased recommendation and will use it to update their attitude. We examine how valence of recommendations (negative versus positive) and the number of opportunities to recommend affect the change in attitude. Our findings indicate that providing recommendations changes communicator’s attitude. Implications of the results are discussed.

Marketing Letters, Vol. 27(3), September 2016, pg. 411-421.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11002-015-9360-3
Co-authors:
Gillian Naylor, Associate Professor of Marketing and International Business, University of Nevada
Eugene Sivadas, Professor of Marketing, University of Washington

Mohan Tanniru
Professor of Management Information Systems
The Path to the Top – Insights from Career Histories of Top 100 CIOs – An Exploratory Study
The research objective of this article is to identify the defining career experiences and educational characteristics of the rungs of the CIO ladder to provide insight for both the firms that hire CIOs and the IT professionals who aspire to be CIOs. The career histories of many CIOs can be discovered through social media data and is the source of the data in this study. We used an inductive methodology to analyze these histories in order to elicit the key identifying features of IT workers who move up the CIO ladder. We categorized the raw data into industry and job types in order to develop a framework that captures key insights and themes that can be used to guide the actions of aspiring CIOs and the firms that recruit them. These initial results suggest an approach for helping workers with the potential for IT leadership to achieve that potential.

Communications of the ACM, Vol. 60(3), March 2017, pg. 60-68.
Full paper:https://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=3055102.2959086
Co-authors:
Daniel J. Mazzola, Assistant Clinical Professor of Information Systems, Arizona State University
Robert D. St. Louis, Professor of Information Systems, Arizona State University

Paul Licker
Professor of Management Information Systems
Do Not Call Me Chief Information Officer, But Chief Integration Officer. A Summary of the 2011 Detroit CIO Roundtable
In 2011 a roundtable meeting of Chief Information Officers (CIOs) organized by Oakland University and Wayne State University discussed the emergence of public cloud computing and how this is changing the role of the CIO for medium- and large-sized organizations. This article summarizes the key themes of that roundtable, namely, the continuing change in the role of the CIO as public cloud computing becomes mainstream. The role of the CIO is evolving toward managing the integration of externally acquired standardized hardware, software, and services while retaining quality control and remaining within budget, as well as the need to be more acquainted with the legal side of contracting. This changing set of CIO responsibilities has not made the technical skills any less important, but it has added a host of additional skills that the CIOs now need to master.

Communications of the AIS, Vol. 34, 2014, pg. 1333-1346.
Full paper:https://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol34/iss1/69
Co-authors:
Arik Ragowsky, Director of Manufacturing Information Systems Center, Wayne State University
Myles Stern, Associate Professor of Accounting, Wayne State University
Jacob Miller, Department of Management, Drexel University
David Gefen, Department of Management, Drexel University

Paul Licker
Professor of Management Information Systems
The Center Cannot Hold: How Leading Firms are Managing the Changing Boundaries of IT
The IT world is going through rapid and drastic changes with the emergence of new business models and, with them, the changing of internal and external organizational boundaries. A recent CIO roundtable, organized by Oakland University and Wayne State University, composed of the CIOs of some of the leading corporations in Greater Detroit discussed the impact of these shifting boundaries on IT issues including outsourcing, careers, and employee development. Contemporary IT depends on external vendors, yet these relationships can be complicated. Employees are increasingly mobile, and the skillsets that firms demand are changing significantly. The panelists suggested that firms should focus on developing and engaging employees despite the risks of turnover. Boundary spanning, both within firms and between firms, has become the chief mode of CIO responsibility.

Communications of the AIS, Vol. 36, June 2015, pg. 655-667.
Full paper:https://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol36/iss1/33
Co-authors:
Arik Ragowsky, Director of Manufacturing Information Systems Center, Wayne State University
Jacob Miller, Department of Management, Drexel University
David Gefen, Department of Management, Drexel University
Myles Stern, Associate Professor of Accounting, Wayne State University

Management

Tianxu Chen
Assistant Professor of Management
The Clock is Ticking! Executive Temporal Depth, Industry Velocity and Competitive Aggressiveness
The inherently temporal nature of competitive phenomena has brought the issue of time to the forefront of research on competitive dynamics. We examine how the interplay between executive temporal depth (time horizons that executives consider when contemplating past and future events) and industry velocity (the rate at which new opportunities emerge and disappear in an industry) shapes competitive aggressiveness (a firm’s propensity to challenge rivals directly and intensely in order to maintain or improve its market position) and firm performance. Based on panel data (from 1995 to 2000) from 258 firms in 23 industries, we found that executive temporal depth exhibited different patterns of relationships with competitive aggressiveness in low- and high-velocity industries. Moreover, competitive aggressiveness had a positive main effect on firm performance, but this effect was stronger in high-velocity industries than in low-velocity industries.

Strategic Management Journal, Vol. 37(6), June 2016, pg. 1132-1153.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1002/smj.2376
Co-authors:
Sucheta Nadkarni, Professor of Chinese Management, Cambridge Judge Business School, University of Cambridge
Jianhong Chen, Assistant Professor of Strategic Management, University of New Hampshire

Jae Hyeung Kang
Assistant Professor of Management
Lizabeth A. Barclay
Professor of Management
Affective and Normative Motives to Work Overtime in Asian Organizations: Four Cultural Orientations from Confucian Ethics
Asian workplaces are often characterized by cultures that require more overtime than other cultures. Although predictors for overtime work have been rigorously studied, it is still meaningful to investigate specific aspects of Eastern cultural values that stem from Confucian ethics and may influence overtime work among Asian employees. We suggest that four major Confucian orientations are positively associated with employees’ affective and normative motives, which in turn affect working overtime. This article extends management literature on the subjects of cultural ethics and workaholism. It also suggests how Eastern cultural values lead to working overtime. We hope that our research effort on Confucian cultural value and its associations with other managerial outcomes and theories is a small cornerstone that allows management researchers to explore interesting and meaningful ways to apply Confucian culture and orientations in the workplace.

Journal of Business Ethics, Vol. 140(1), January 2017, pg. 115-130.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-015-2683-4
Co-author:
James G. Matusik, Doctoral Student, Eli Broad College of Business, Michigan State University

Product Design and Innovation

Janell D. Townsend
Professor of Marketing
Do or Die: Competitive Effects and Red Queen Dynamics in the Product Survival Race
This study explores the reciprocal relationship between the nature and duration of competition, and innovation outcomes. We propose that the perpetually driven, reciprocal sequence of competitive action and reaction known as the “Red Queen” in evolutionary biology is a cardinal force behind the success of innovations. We test our hypotheses applying a comprehensive data set of all automobile manufacturers known to compete in the U.S. automobile market at any time between 1946 and 2008. Using data composed of 8,203 model–year pairs, 1071 models from 148 different brands, we find that recent competitive experiences of models, rather than those in the distant past, make them more 15 viable competitors. Additionally, superior reputation and market share are found to effectively shield models from the pernicious effects of Red Queen competition.

Industrial and Corporate Change, Vol. 24(3), June 2015, pg. 721-738.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1093/icc/dtv017
Co-author:
Mehmet Berk Talay, Associate Professor of Marketing, University of Massachusetts Lowell

Janell D. Townsend
Professor of Marketing
Enhancing Consumers’ Affection for a Brand Using Product Design
This paper develops a conceptual framework and hypotheses that theoretically connect design-based values, at the product level, to affective brand-level relational outcomes with the brand. We postulate a brand affection construct that is defined as the passion and pride a consumer feels about owning a brand. Using syndicated product-level data from the automotive industry collected from a national sample of consumers, the goal of this research is to explain the brand-level affective outcomes that product-level design features can create. A confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation model are developed to test the conceptual model. This research finds that the social value and emotional value a design provides to consumers have a greater effect on brand affection than purely transactional values, such as functional value or economic value. The results provide new insights about how consumers’ perceptions of the value of product design at the product level can help create enduring relationships with brands.

Journal of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 32(5), September 2015, pg. 716-730.
Full paper:https://doi.org/10.1111/jpim.12245
Co-authors:
Minu Kumar, Associate Professor of Marketing, San Francisco State University
Douglas W. Vorhies, Professor of Marketing, University of Mississippi

Psychology

Venugopal Balijepally
Associate Professor of Management Information Systems
Task Mental Model and Software Developer’s Performance: An Experimental Investigation
Our understanding of factors influencing the effectiveness of software-development processes has evolved in recent times. However, few research studies have furthered our understanding of the cognitive factors underlying software development activities and their impact on performance and affective outcomes. In this study, we fill this gap by developing a measurement approach to capture and evaluate the quality of mental models. We investigate the efficacy of mental models in software development using the said approach. We assessed mental model quality by statistically comparing the software developer’s mental model with a referent model derived from multiple experts. Results suggest that a software developer’s mental model quality is a determinant of software quality. Further, we found this effect to be consistent across software development tasks of varying complexities. These results shed light on the impact of mental models in software development, and their significant implications for stimulating future research on cognitive factors influencing software development practices.

Communications of the AIS, Vol. 36(1), 2015, pg. 53-76.
Full paper: http://aisel.aisnet.org/cais/vol36/iss1/4
Co-authors:
Sridhar Nerur, Professor of Information Systems, University of Texas at Arlington
RadhaKanta Mahapatra, Professor of Information Systems, University of Texas at Arlington


Kim Serota
Visiting Professor of Marketing
The Effects of Truth-Lie Base-Rate on Interactive Deception Detection Accuracy
The truth-lie base rate is a critical yet underappreciated factor in deception detection. It refers to the proportion of truthful and deceptive messages judged in a deception detection task. Consistent with Park and Levine’s (PL) probability model of deception detection accuracy, previous research has shown that as the proportion of honest messages increases, there is a corresponding linear increase in correct truth–lie discrimination.

Three experiments (N=120, 205, and 243, respectively) varied the truth–lie base rate in an interactive deception detection task. Linear base-rate effects were observed in all 3 experiments (average effect r=.61) regardless of whether the judges were interactive participants or passive observers, previously acquainted or strangers, or previously exposed to truths or lies. The predictive power of the PL probability model appears robust and extends to interactive deception despite PL’s logical incompatibility with interpersonal deception theory.

Human Communication Research, Vol. 40(3), July 2014, pg. 350-372.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1111/hcre.12027
Co-authors:
Timothy Levine, Distinguished Professor and Chair of Communication Studies, Korea University
David D. Clare, Department of Communication, Michigan State University
Tracie Green, Department of Communication, Michigan State University
Hee Sun Park, Professor of Communication, Korea University


Steven Stanton II
Associate Professor of Marketing
Neuromarketing: Ethical Implications of Its Use and Potential Misuse
Neuromarketing is an emerging field in which academic and industry research scientists employ neuroscience techniques to study marketing practices and consumer behavior.

Herein, we will articulate common ethical concerns with neuromarketing as currently practiced, focusing on the potential risks to consumers and the ethical decisions faced by companies.

We argue that the most frequently raised concerns — threats to consumer autonomy, privacy, and control — do not rise to meaningful ethical issues given the current capabilities and implementation of neuromarketing research. But, we identify how potentially serious ethical issues may emerge from neuromarketing research practices in industry, which are largely proprietary and opaque. We identify steps that can mitigate associated ethical risks and thus reduce the threats to consumers. We conclude that neuromarketing has clear potential for positive impact on society and consumers, a fact rarely considered in the discussion on the ethics of neuromarketing.

Journal of Business Ethics, Published online, February 2016, pg. 1-13.
Full paper: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10551-016-3059-0
Co-authors:
Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Chauncey Stillman Professor of Practical Ethics, Duke University
Scott A. Huettel, Jerry G. and Patricia Crawford Hubbard Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience, Duke University

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