Golden Grizzlies Compliance

Recreation and Athletics Center, Room 201
569 Pioneer Drive
Rochester, MI 48309-4482
(location map)
(248) 370-2587

Prospective Student Athletes

This page aims to provide guidance in regard to the NCAA rules and regulations that apply to specifically to prospective student-athletes and their parents. To see the answers to the questions in gold on each tab, click on the question. Please utilize the resources below and if you have any specific questions please contact the Athletics Compliance Office.
NCAA Eligibility
Center
What is the "Eligibility Center"?



The NCAA Eligibility Center maintains and processes all initial-eligibility and amateurism certifications, both of which are required in order to practice, compete, and receive athletics-related financial aid. Click here to access the Eligibility Center website.

Who must register?

All high school prospective student-athletes who want to compete in athletics at the collegiate level as well as all two-year college student-athletes who are entering a Division I or II institution for the first time, and current students who intend to participate must also register with the Eligibility Center.

When should I register?

You are able to register with the Eligibility Center at any time. However, it is recommended that high school students register at the beginning of their junior year. Students must be registered with the Eligibility Center prior to making an official visit to any NCAA institution (during their senior year of high school) and prior to signing a National Letter of Intent. Two-year college transfer students must register prior to signing a National Letter of Intent.

How does the registration process work?

You must register online and pay the registration fee. In order to receive a certification, high school students must submit official high school transcripts, proof of graduation, official ACT or SAT test scores, and complete the amateurism questions. Two-year transfer students are required to complete the amateurism questions, and it is recommended that they submit official high school transcripts, proof of graduation, and an official ACT/SAT test score.

How do I become eligible?

Becoming eligible for intercollegiate athletics is a process that involves maintaining the appropriate academic standards to participate, certifying that an individual is an amateur and timely submission of appropriate documentation to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Please utilize the resources below, and if you have any questions don’t hesitate to contact the Athletics Compliance Office.

What are the eligibility standards I need to meet?

College-bound prospects who want to practice, compete and receive athletically related financial aid during their initial year of enrollment need to meet the following requirements:
  1. Graduate from high school.
  2. Complete a minimum of 16 core courses. (4 years of English, 3 years of Math, 2 years of Natural/Physical Science, 1 additional year of English/Math/Science, 2 years of Social Studies, and 4 years of other core courses)
  3. Earn a minimum required grade-point average in core classes.
  4. Earn a qualifying test score on either the ACT or SAT.
  5. Request final amateurism certification from the NCAA Eligibility Center.

For Division I prospects who are looking to enroll on or after August 1, 2016, the requirements to compete in the first year of college will change. In addition to the above standards, prospects must:

  1. Earn at least a 2.3 grade-point average in core courses.
  2. Meet an increased sliding-scale standard (for example a 820 SAT score or a 68 Sum ACT score will require a 2.50 Core GPA).
  3. Successfully complete 10 of the 16 total required core courses before the start of the seventh semester in high school.  Seven (7) of the 10 courses must be successfully completed in English, Math and Natural/Physical Science.

Prospects who earn a 2.0 Core GPA and meet the current sliding scale standard (for example, an SAT score of 820 or Sum ACT score of 68), but do not meet the 2.3 Core GPA requirement will be eligible for practice in the first term and receive athletically related financial aid the entire year, but will not be allowed to compete.  Freshman who are academically successful in the first term will earn the ability to continue to practice for the remainder of the year.

Please utilize the resources below to learn more about eligibility standards.


Recruiting
Calendars
Sport-Specific Recruiting Calendars
Signing Dates for Prospective Student-Athletes Enrolling in 2015-16

SportInitial Signing DateFinal Signing Date
Basketball (Early Period)November 11, 2015November 18, 2015
Basketball (Regular Period)April 13, 2015May 18, 2016 (DI)
SoccerFebruary 3, 2016August 1, 2016
All Other Sports (Early Period)November 11, 2015November 18, 2015
All Other Sports (Regular Period)April 13, 2016August 1, 2016
NCAA Rules
Questions
Who is a "Prospective Student-Athlete"?

A prospective student-athlete is a student who has started classes for the ninth grade. In addition, a student who has not started classes for the ninth grade becomes a prospective student-athlete if the institution provides such an individual (or the individual's relatives or friends) any financial assistance or other benefits that the institution does not provide to prospective students generally.

An individual remains a prospective student-athlete until one of the following occurs (whichever is earlier):
  • The individual registers and enrolls in a minimum full-time program of studies and attends classes in any term of four-year institution's regular academic year (excluding summer); or
  • The individual participates in a regular squad practice or competition at a four-year institution that occurs before the beginning of any term; or
  • The individual officially registers and enrolls and attends classes during the summer prior to initial enrollment and receives athletics financial aid.

One a prospective student-athlete signs either:

  • a National Letter of Intent;
  • a written offer of Admission; or
  • a Written offer of Financial Aid
they are no longer subject to the recruiting restrictions of contacts & evaluations. However, that prospective student-athlete is still subject to other NCAA rules involving recruiting.

In basketball, a student who has started classes for the seventh grade is considered a prospective student-athlete.

When does a Prospective Student-Athlete become "Recruited"?

A prospective student-athlete become "recruited" by Oakland when any of the following occurs:
  1. Oakland provides the prospect with an official visit;
  2. An Oakland staff member or booster has an arranged, in-person, off-campus encounter with the prospect or the prospect's parent(s), relative(s) or legal guardian(s);
  3. An Oakland staff member or booster initiates or arranges a telephone contact with the prospect's relatives or legal guardian(s) on more than one occasion for the purpose of recruitment; or
  4. Oakland issues a National Letter of Intent (NLI) or an institutional written offer of athletically-related financial aid to the prospect. Issuing a written offer of athletically-related financial aid to a prospect to attend a summer session prior to full-time enrollment does not cause the prospect to become recruited.

What rules do I need to know about in-person recruiting?

Coaches are restricted in their ability to see and/or interact with a prospect in person. Restrictions are based on the prospect's age and the associated sport's recruiting calendar.

Recruiting calendars differ by sport and are made of up of four different time periods during which varying levels of coach-to-prospect interactions are allowed.

Contact Period: During this time, a college coach may have in-person contact with a prospect and/or his/her parents on or off the college's campus. The coach may also watch a prospect play or visit his/her high school.

Dead Period: During this time, a college coach may not have any in-person contact with a prospect or his/her parents on or off a college's campus.

Evaluation Period: During this time, a college coach may watch a prospect play or visit his/her high school, but cannot have any in-person conversations with a prospect or his/her parents off the college's campus. A prospect and his/her parents can visit a college campus during this time period.

Quiet Period: During this time, a college coach may not have any in-person contact with a prospect or his/her parents off the college's campus. The coach may not watch a prospect play or visit his/her high school during this period. A prospect and his/her parents may visit a college campus during this time period.

"Contact": A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with you or your parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with you or your parents at your high school or any location where you are competing or practicing.

"Evaluation": An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete.


What rules do I need to know about phone calls, emails and text messages?

Prospective student-athletes are allowed to make telephone calls to institutional staff members, at their own expense, at any time.

In sports other than men's basketball, swimming/diving and cross country/track & field, telephone calls and electronic correspondence to a prospect (or his or her relatives or legal guardians) may not be sent until September 1 at the beginning of a prospect's junior year in high school. If a prospect attends an educational institution that uses a non-traditional academic calendar (e.g., Southern Hemisphere), telephone calls to the prospect (or his or her relatives or legal guardians) may not be made before the opening day of classes of their junior year in high school.  Thereafter, coaches in these sports are not restricted to the number of  telephone calls and text messages to the prospect. 

Below are the telephone call and electronic correspondence (email, text message, etc.) restrictions in the sports of men's basketball, swimming & diving, and cross country/track &field.

Sport Phone
Men's Basketball
  • Telephone calls shall not be made to a prospect (or his relatives or legal guardians) until June 15 at the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school.
  • Electronic correspondence shall not be sent to a prospect (or his relatives or legal guardians) until June 15 at the conclusion of his sophomore year in high school. 
  • After June 15 at the conclusion of a prospect's sophomore year in high school, coaches are not restricted to the number of telephone calls and text messages to the prospect.
Swimming & Diving
  • Telephone calls shall not be made to a prospect (or his or her relatives or legal guardians) until July 1 following the completion of his or her junior year in high school.
  • After July 1 following the completion of the prospect's junior year in high school, coaches may call a prospect once per week.
  • Electronic correspondence that may be sent to a prospect is limited to email and fax only, and shall not be sent to a prospect (or his relatives or legal guardians) until September 1 at the beginning of a prospect's junior year.
  • After a prospect signs an NLI, the institution's written offer of admission or financial aid, there is no limit on the forms of electronic correspondence.
Cross Country/Track & Field
  • Telephone calls shall not be made to a prospect (or his or her relatives or legal guardians) until July 1 following the completion of his or her junior year in high school.
  • After July 1 following the completion of the prospect's junior year in high school, coaches may call a prospect once per week outside a contact period, and at the institution's discretion during a contact period.
  • Electronic correspondence that may be sent to a prospect is limited to email and fax only, and shall not be sent to a prospect (or his relatives or legal guardians) until September 1 at the beginning of a prospect's junior year.
  • After a prospect signs an NLI, the institution's written offer of admission or financial aid, there is no limit on the forms of electronic correspondence.

Additionally, in women's basketball, during the July Evaluation Periods, all communication (in all forms) is prohibited with a prospect, her parents or legal guardians, the prospect's coach, or any individual directly or indirectly associated with the prospect as a result of the prospect participating in basketball, is prohibited.

There are some exceptions to these general rules, but prospects with any questions are encouraged to contact the Athletics Compliance staff with any questions they might have.


What rules do I need to know about written correspondence?

Generally speaking, in sports other than men's basketball, coaches are allowed to begin sending recruiting material to prospects (or his or her parents or legal guardians) starting September 1 at the beginning of their junior year in high school. 

In men's basketball, college coaches are permitted to begin sending recruiting material to prospects (or his parents or legal guardians) beginning June 15 at the conclusion of their sophomore year in high school. 

Below is a list of the permissible recruiting material that may be sent to a prospect:

  • General Correspondence- There are no restrictions on the design or content of the general correspondense and attachments, except the size of any printed material must not exceed 8 1/2 by 11 inches when opened in full.
  • Camp or Clinic Information-  Camp or clinic information may be provided at any time (coaches do not have to wait until the dates above to mail prospects such information).
  • Questionnaires- May be provided to prospects at any time (coaches do not have to wait until date above to mail prospects such document).
  • Non-athletics Institutional Publications- Non-athletics publications such as official academic, admissions and student-services material may be provided to prospects at any time, as long as such information is available to prospective students generally.
  • Educational Material Published by the NCAA- Such material can be provided to prospects at any time (coaches do not have to wait until the dates above to mail educational material published by the NCAA to prospects).

An institutional staff member may respond to a prospect's letter or email requesting information from an athletics department staff member prior to the permissible date on which they may provide recruiting materials to a prospect, provided the response does not include information that would initiate the recruitment of the prospect or information about the institution's athletics programs (e.g. the reply explains a current NCAA rule or a referral to the admissions office).


Camps and Clinics

An institutional camp or clinic is defined as any camp or clinic that is owned or operated by a university or an employee of the university's athletics department, and which prospects participate.
 
Purpose of Camp/Clinic
An institutional camp or clinic shall be one that:
  • Places special emphasis on a particular sport or sports and provides specialized instruction or practice and may also include competition;
  • Involves activities designed to improve overall skills and general knowledge in the sport; or
  • Offers a diversified experience without emphasis on instruction, practice or competition in any particular sport.
Attendance Restriction                                                                
A university's sport camp or clinic shall be open to any and all entrants (limited only by number, age, grade level and/or gender).
 
Camp/ Clinic Employment
Once a prospect signs a National Letter of Intent with a university, he or she is able to work institutional camps and clinics.  Compensation may be paid only for work actually performed and at the going rate in the local area for similar services.   
 
Concession Arrangement
A prospects is not allowed to operate a concession to sell items related to or associated with the camp or clinic.
 
Awards
Prospects may receive awards from a institutional camp or clinic.

Recruiting Restriction
Interactions between prospects and coaches who are employed at an institutional camp or clinic are not subject to recruiting calendar restrictions. However, an Oakland staff member employed at any camp or clinic is prohibited from recruiting any prospective student-athlete during the time period that the camp or clinic is conducted. The prohibition against recruiting includes extending written offers of financial aid to any prospect during his or her attendance at the camp or clinic, but does not include recruiting conversations between Oakland's coach and a participating prospect during Oakland camps or clinics. Coaches who wish to attend the camp as observers must comply with the appropriate recruiting periods. Institutional camps or clinics may not be conducted during a dead period.


Common recruiting terms and phrases

"Booster"

A "booster" (which is called a "representative of athletics interest" by NCAA rules) is an individual, independent agency or corporate entity that:
  • Has participated in and is a member of an agency or organization that promotes Oakland's athletics programs;
  • Makes a financial contribution to Oakland University athletics or its booster organizations (or is a member of these organizations);
  • Assists in the recruitment of prospects for Oakland;
  • Provides benefits (e.g., jobs, occasional meals) to enrolled student-athletes;
  • Has purchased season tickets for any Oakland athletics program; or
  • Has otherwise promoted Oakland's athletics programs.
Once an individual has been identified as a "booster", he or she retains that status forever, even if they no longer do any of the above. See more information on "boosters" below.

"Contact
"

A contact occurs any time a coach has any face-to-face contact with you or your parents off the college's campus and says more than hello. A contact also occurs if a coach has any contact with you or your parents at your high school or any location where you are competing or practicing.

"Evaluation"

An evaluation is an activity by a coach to evaluate your academic or athletics ability. This would include visiting your high school or watching you practice or compete.

"Letter of Intent"

The National Letter of Intent (NLI) is a voluntary program administered by the NCAA Eligibility Center. By signing an NLI, the college-bound student-athlete agrees to attend the college or university for one academic year. In exchange, that college or university must provide athletic-related financial aid for one academic year. A valid NLI must include an offer of athletic-related financial aid.

This is often confused with a "Written Offer of Admission", which is a form indicating that a prospect accepts the institution's offer of admission, and intends to attend that institution.

"Verbal Commitment"

This phrase is used to describe a college-bound student-athlete's commitment to a school before he or she signs (or is able to sign) a National Letter of Intent. A college-bound student-athlete can announce a verbal commitment at any time. While verbal commitments have become very popular for both college-bound student-athletes and coaches, this "commitment" is NOT binding on either the college-bound student-athlete or the college or university. Only the signing of the National Letter of Intent accompanied by a financial aid agreement is binding on both parties.


Who is a "booster", and what rules about "boosters" do I need to know about?

A "booster" (which is called a "representative of athletics interest" by NCAA rules) is an individual, independent agency or corporate entity that:
  • Has participated in and is a member of an agency or organization that promotes Oakland's athletics programs;
  • Makes a financial contribution to Oakland University athletics or its booster organizations (or is a member of these organizations);
  • Assists in the recruitment of prospects for Oakland;
  • Provides benefits (e.g., jobs, occasional meals) to enrolled student-athletes;
  • Has purchased season tickets for any Oakland athletics program; or
  • Has otherwise promoted Oakland's athletics programs.
Once an individual has been identified as a "booster", he or she retains that status forever, even if they no longer do any of the above.

Boosters are prohibited from contacting or calling prospective student-athletes (or contact a prospect's coach, principal or counselor) in an effort to evaluate them or to recruit them in an effort to participate in athletics at Oakland University. Only Oakland’s coaches are allowed to contact prospects off-campus relating to their recruitment. While unavoidable incidental contact (that takes place somewhere aside from a prospect’s school or place of practice/competition) is permissible, such contact must not be made for the purpose of recruitment.

Boosters are not allowed to be involved (directly or indirectly) in making arrangements for or giving or offering to give any financial aid or other benefits to a prospective student-athlete (or his or her relatives or friends), other than expressly permitted by NCAA rules. Specifically prohibited financial aid, benefits and arrangements include, but aren’t limited to, the following:

a. An employment arrangement for a prospective student-athlete's relatives;
b. Gift of clothing or equipment;
c. Co-signing of loans;
d. Providing loans to a prospective student-athlete's relatives or friends;
e. Cash or like items;
f. Any tangible items, including merchandise;
g. Free or reduced-cost services, rentals or purchases of any type;
h. Free or reduced-cost housing;
i. Use of an institution's athletics equipment (e.g., for a high school all-star game);
j. Sponsorship of or arrangement for an awards banquet for high school, preparatory school or two-year-college athletes by an institution, representatives of its athletics interests or its alumni groups or booster clubs; and
k. Expenses for academic services (e.g., tutoring, test preparation) to assist in the completion of initial-eligibility or transfer-eligibility requirements or improvement of the prospective student-athlete's academic profile in conjunction with a waiver request.

Receipt of a benefit is not a violation of NCAA rules if it is determined that the same benefit is generally available to prospective students (or their relatives or friends) or to a particular segment of the student body (e.g. international students, minority students) determined on a basis unrelated to athletics ability.


What do I need to know about athletic scholarships and financial aid?

Athletics scholarships are awarded by NCAA Divisions I and II colleges and universities. Division III colleges and universities do not award financial aid based on athletics ability, but you may be eligible to receive academic scholarships or need-based financial aid. It is important to understand several key aspects involving athletics scholarships.

Below is a list of commonly-asked questions and answers about NCAA rules and athletics scholarships. For specific information involving financial aid at Oakland University, please contact the Office of Student Financial Services.

Does the NCAA award athletics scholarships? No. Individual colleges and universities award athletics scholarships, not the NCAA. Divisions I and II schools offer athletics scholarships, but Division III colleges and universities only offer academic scholarships. NCAA colleges and universities provide more than $1.5 billion in athletics scholarships annually.

Is an athletics scholarship guaranteed for four years? No. Oakland University offers athletic-related financial aid for a period of one academic year (Fall and Winter semesters). Athletics scholarships may be renewed annually, and institutions must notify the student-athlete in writing by July 1 whether their athletics scholarship will be renewed for the next academic year.

Individual colleges and universities have appeal policies for scholarships that are reduced or not renewed. In most cases, the coach decides who gets a scholarship, what it covers and whether it will be renewed. Student-athletes who render themselves ineligible for competition, engage in serious misconduct, fraudulently misrepresent themselves in writing (application, letter of intent, financial aid agreement) or voluntarily withdraw from a sport may have their athletics scholarship removed by NCAA rules.

What do athletics scholarships cover? Divisions I and II athletics scholarships are awarded in a variety of amounts. Colleges and universities are permitted to provide a student-athlete with tuition and fees, room, board and required course-related books.

Do many high school athletes earn athletics scholarships? No, very few in fact. According to recent statistics, about two percent of high school athletes nationally are awarded athletics scholarships to compete in college. This small number means high school student-athletes and their parents need to have realistic expectations about receiving an athletics scholarship to play sports at a college or universities.

Is the National Letter of Intent the same as an athletics scholarship? No. The National Letter of Intent (NLI) is a binding agreement between a prospective student-athlete and an NLI member institution. With the agreement, a prospective student-athlete agrees to attend the institution full-time for one academic year (two semesters) and the institution agrees to provide athletics financial aid for at least one academic year (two semesters). If a student-athlete does not fulfill the NLI agreement, he or she has to serve one year in residence (full-time, two semesters) at the next NLI member institution and lose one season of competition in all sports. For more information regarding the NLI program, please visit the links at the bottom of this page.

Can student-athletes receive other financial aid unrelated to athletics? Yes. Thousands of student-athletes benefit from academic scholarships and need-based aid, such as federal Pell Grants. Sometimes student-athletes cannot accept certain types of aid because of NCAA amateurism or financial aid requirements. Student-athletes must report all scholarships they receive to their institution's financial aid office.

Student-athletes and parents with additional questions or who are (or will be) receiving outside financial aid while attending Oakland University should contact the Athletics Compliance Office or the Office of Student Financial Services.

What is "amateurism" and how does it relate to intercollegiate athletics?

Only an amateur student-athlete is eligible for intercollegiate athletics participation in a particular sport. Because of this, all freshmen and transfer student-athletes initially enrolling at a Division I institution are required to complete the amateurism certification process with the NCAA Eligibility Center. This process ensures that NCAA amateurism regulations are applied uniformly for all incoming student-athletes.

The NCAA Eligibility Center may review the following high school athletics activities in determining a college-bound student-athlete's amateurism status:
  • Contracts with a professional team.
  • Salary for participating in athletics.
  • Prize money.
  • Play with professionals.
  • Tryouts, practice or competition with a professional team.
  • Benefits from an agent or prospective agent.
  • Agreement to be represented by an agent.
  • Delayed initial full-time collegiate enrollment to participate in organized competition.
In order for the NCAA to gather information regarding these activities, each prospect is asked to answer questions regarding his or her sports participation history when he or she registers with the Eligibility Center. By answering these questions, each prospect helps the NCAA capture a picture of their amateur status and to identify any potential issues that might conflict with NCAA rules. If the agreed-upon facts of the prospect's history indicate that a violation occurred, an eligibility penalty will be imposed based on the severity of the violations. Penalties include repayment of money, sitting out a specified number of games or, in rare cases, permanent ineligibility.

What about amateur athletic clubs (AAU, club programs, etc.)?

Prospects may participate on amateur sports clubs provided they do not receive expenses in excess of travel, lodging or equipment for practice or competition. A prospect may accept prize money based on performance in an open competition as long as the prize is awarded by the sponsor of the event and the amount of the prize does not exceed the prospect's expenses to compete in the event. For specific questions about amateurism, please contact the Athletics Compliance Office.

What if I am an international prospective student athlete?

International student-athletes must be admitted to (and enrolled in) a full-time, degree-seeking program at Oakland University in order to be eligible to participate in intercollegiate athletics. For question on admissions requirements for prospective international students, please refer to Undergraduate Admissions or Graduate Admissions.

With global recruiting becoming more common, determining the amateur status of college-bound student-athletes can be challenging. All college-bound student-athletes, including international students, need to adhere to NCAA amateurism requirements (see above) in order to preserve their eligibility for NCAA intercollegiate athletics.

International prospective student-athletes must meet academic eligibility requirements prescribed on the educational path in their home country. Any transcript or documentation used in a language other than English must be sent with an official English translation to the NCAA Eligibility Center. Academic eligibility requirements also require an international prospective student-athlete to submit an ACT or SAT score to the NCAA Eligibility Center, which corresponds to a core-course GPA based on classes taken. For information on academic requirements for a specific country, please refer to the Guide to International Academic Standards, FAQs for International College-Bound Student-Athletes, or contact the Athletics Compliance Office.


What if I want to transfer to Oakland and participate in intercollegiate athletics?

Student-athletes who attend a four-year institution (NCAA or NAIA) and are interested in transferring to Oakland University must first obtain written permission to contact Oakland University from their current or previous institution's athletics compliance office or director of athletics, prior to communicating (e.g., email or telephone calls) with Oakland coaches or athletics department personnel.

A prospective student-athlete who is enrolled in the first year of a two-year college who was not certified as a Qualifier with the Eligibility Center (see the tab on the top of this page for more information) may not be contacted in-person on or off of Oakland's campus for recruiting purposes. However, such prospects are still allowed to make or receive calls and electronic correspondence with coaching staff.

More information about the rules (including academic requirements) that prospects who intend to transfer to an NCAA institution need to know can be found in the Transfer 101: Basic information you need to know about transferring to an NCAA college.


What if I am a current Oakland student and want to join a team?

Current students are still subject to the same rules regarding eligibility as prospective student-athletes before they attended Oakland, and as current student-athletes after enrollment (in regard to academics, amateurism, etc.). A student-athlete may be able to be certified to participate temporarily with a team until they have been certified by the NCAA Eligibility Center and institutionally. If you are interested in joining one of Oakland’s Athletic programs, please contact the staff of the individual sport in which you are interested in. Each team's walk-on policies are different, and the coaching staff can answer any questions you might have regarding that team's walk-on procedures.

National Letter
of Intent
The National Letter of Intent (NLI) is a binding agreement between a prospective student-athlete and an NLI member institution. With the agreement, a prospective student-athlete agrees to attend the institution full-time for one academic year (two semesters) and the institution agrees to provide athletic-related financial aid for at least one academic year (two semesters). If a student-athlete does not fulfill the NLI agreement, he or she has to serve one year in residence (full-time, two semesters) at the next NLI member institution and lose one season of competition in all sports. For more information regarding the National Letter of Intent Program, visit the NLI website.

Prospects Who May Sign a NLI:


In order to sign a NLI, a prospective student-athlete must first register with the NCAA Eligibility Center and complete the amateurism certification questionnaire.

The following prospective student-athletes may sign a NLI:
  • Prospective student-athletes who will be attending a four-year institution in the fall for the first time as full-time students (including high school, preparatory school, or two-year college).
  • 4-2-4 transfer student-athletes who will be graduating from a two-year college.
Financial Aid Requirement

A NLI must be accompanied by a financial aid agreement from the institution.

Coaching Changes


A NLI is an agreement with an institution and not a particular coach. For example, if a coach leaves an institution after a prospective student-athlete signs a NLI, the prospective student-athlete remains bound the by the provisions of the NLI.

Dead Period Restrictions

The NLI initial signing date is surrounded by a dead period that starts at 12:01 AM on Monday prior to the initial date of signing and ends Thursday at midnight after the initial date of signing. No in-person on- or off-campus contacts are permitted during a dead period. In sports other than football, you may make unlimited telephone calls to prospects on the initial date for signing a NLI and the two days following the initial date of signing.

Recruiting Ban after Signing

Once a prospective student-athlete signs a valid NLI, other institutions may not call, write or have contact with the prospect or the prospect's parents.

Other Rules related to the NLI

Any in-person, off-campus contact made with a prospect for purposes of signing a letter of intent or other commitment to attend the institution, or attendance at activities related to the signing of a letter of intent or other commitment to attend the institution, are strictly prohibited.

In-person, off-campus delivery of a letter of intent by an institutional staff member is prohibited. The letter may be delivered by express mail, courier service, regular mail, email or fax.

Before August 1 of a prospect's senior year in high school, an institution shall not, directly or indirectly, provide a written offer of athletic-related financial aid or indicate in writing to the prospect that an athletic-related grant-in-aid will be offered by the institution. On or after August 1 of a prospect's senior year, an institution may indicate in writing to a prospect that an athletic-related grant-in-aid will be offered by the institution; however, the institution may not permit the prospective student-athlete to sign a form indicating his or her acceptance of such an award before the initial signing date in that sport in the NLI program.