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9/2012 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, Ph.D, associate professor of communication, authored the article, "Theorizing the Role of Courage in Resistance: A Feminist Rhetorical Analysis of Aung San Suu Kyi's 'Freedom From Fear' Speech" which appears as the lead article in the international, peer-reviewed journal, Communication, Culture & Critique 5.3 (2012): 313-332. Dr. Palmer-Mehta presented a version of this paper earlier this year at the Crossroads in Cultural Studies International Conference held in Paris and hosted by Sorbonne Nouvelle University and UNESCO.

6/2011 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, associate professor of communication and journalism, and Alina Haliliuc, a doctoral candidate at the University of Iowa, authored the article, "The Performance of Silence in Cristian Mungiu's 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days," which appears as the lead article in the national communication journal, Text and Performance Quarterly (v31.2, April 2011). Additionally, Dr. Palmer-Mehta will present her paper, "Re-imagining Community through Julie Laible's Loving Epistemology" at the 2011 International Communication Association convention, held in Boston in May 2011.

6/2009 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor of communication authored the article, "Aung San Suu Kyi and the Rhetoric of Social Protest," which appears in volume 32.2 of "Women's Studies in Communication." The article provides a case study of the speech that marks Aung San Suu Kyi's emergence as a leader of the pro-democracy opposition in Burma, focusing on her use of collective memory and an ethic of care. Additionally, Palmer-Mehta's article, "Motivational Appeals and Ethics" appears in volume 23.1 of "Communication Teacher." The essay examines the ethical dilemmas presented by motivational appeals in historical and contemporary media in the U.S. and Germany.

4/2009 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor for the department of Communication and Journalism, along with Alina Haliliuc, a doctoral candidate in the department of Communication Studies at the University of Iowa, authored the book chapter, "Reality Television: The Business of Mediating (Extra)Ordinary Life," which appears in Robert Sickel's "The Business of Entertainment-Television." The chapter explores the business practices of reality television and makes predictions regarding the future of the genre. Additionally, Palmer-Mehta and Haliliuc's paper, "The Performance of Silence in Cristian Mungiu's 4 Months, 3 Weeks, and 2 Days," was selected as a top paper in the Feminist and Women's Studies Division of the 2009 National Communication Association Convention, which takes place this November in Chicago. In the paper, the authors complicate traditional views on silence, extend work on silence as resistance, and demonstrate that the performance of silence can serve as a productive space for generating meaning and enacting resistance.

11/2007 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor of communication in the Department of Rhetoric, Communication, and Journalism, earned the top competitive paper award from the Feminist and Women's Studies Division of the National Communication Association. Palmer-Mehta's paper, "Aung San Suu Kyi and the Rhetoric of Social Protest in Burma," was selected as the top paper from among 130 submissions. Palmer-Mehta will present this paper, as well as the research paper, "'Flavor of Love': Representing Black Masculinity," at the 2007 National Communication Association Convention in Chicago, November 15-18.

12/2005 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor of communication, authored the book chapter, "Disciplining the Masculine: The Disruptive Power of Janice Soprano," which will appear in David Lavery's book, "Reading the Sopranos: Hit TV on HBO." The book is scheduled for release in March 2006, coinciding with the debut of the sixth season of the program.

11/2005 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor of communication, and Kellie Hay, assistant professor of communication, co-authored the research paper, "A Superhero for Gays? Gay Masculinity and Green Lantern," which will appear in the December 2005 issue of the Journal of American Culture (V. 28, N. 4). This paper also was selected to be part of a spotlight panel showcasing the best work submitted by assistant professors in the Critical Cultural Division at the 2005 National Communication Association Convention taking place in Boston this November.

4/2005 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, assistant professor of communication, along with Sharon Howell, professor of communication and chair of the rhetoric, communication and journalism programs, Kellie Hay, assistant professor communication, Jennifer Heisler, assistant professor of communication, Christina Morus, visiting assistant professor of communication, Christine Cronauer, rhetoric, communication and journalism special lecturer and Laurel Humphreys, rhetoric, communication and journalism special lecturer, lead a panel discussion, entitled "The Slipperly Slope from Spongebob to Satan: Does Freedom Mean Freedom is for Everybody?" as part of the Michigan Women's Studies Association (MWSA) Conference being held at Oakland University. The panel members examined the struggle for ideological hegemony in the U.S. over sexuality and its relationship to marriage, the family and traditional gender ideology. The panel opened with a paper that discusses the messages young people receive within the family structure regarding sexuality. The panelists branched off in different directions, examining the current struggle over sexuality in the U.S. from varying disciplinary perspectives.

12/2003 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, visiting assistant professor of communication, and Kellie D. Hay, assistant professor of communication, received a $1,500 grant from the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation's (GLAAD) Center for the Study of Media and Society to conduct an analysis of reader responses to an anti-gay hate crime story line that debuted in the September and October 2002 issues of the long running DC comic book, "The Green Lantern." The results of the study, which were drafted for a nonacademic audience, may be found on the GLAAD Web site. A separate version of the research paper was presented at the National Communication Association (NCA) annual convention, which was held Nov. 19-23 in Miami.

6/2003 - Valerie Palmer-Mehta, visiting assistant professor of communication, and Kellie D. Hay, assistant professor of communication, received a $1,500 grant from the Gay and Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation's (GLAAD) Center for the Study of Media and Society to conduct an analysis of reader responses to an anti-gay hate crime story line that debuted in the Sept. and Oct. 2002 issues of the long-running DC comic book "Green Lantern." A separate version of the research paper has been accepted for presentation at the 2003 National Communication Association Convention in Miami, Fla.


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