Association of Interdisciplinary Studies

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Directories and Listserv

Directories and Listserv

INTERDIS
LISTSERV

Interdis is an e-mail discussion list designed to promote the free exchange of ideas and information about topics such as integration, synthesis, interdisciplinarity and changing disciplines of interest to interdisciplinary researchers, teachers, and students.

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Posting a message:

Address an e-mail to: INTERDIS@bama.ua.edu and send it. After a bit, it will go to the list, and you'll see it, too. Keep in mind there will be a lag time of a few minutes before it will show up. If you want to reply to an INTERDIS message, just hit reply, and your message will go to the INTERDIS list.

Doctoral
Programs
Directory
Directory of IDS Doctoral Programs

The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies has long recognized the importance of providing surveys of interdisciplinary programs. In 1986, the AIS published Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs: A Directory. The second edition, edited by Alan F. Edwards, Jr, and published in 1996 by Copley Publishers, is still available. We now take advantage of the world-wide web to provide a survey of interdisciplinary PhD programs in the Liberal Arts in the United States. Whereas our previous undergraduate Directories provided brief descriptions of programs, in this Directory we provide links to the websites of all listed programs.

The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies hopes that this Directory will aid prospective PhD students who desire an interdisciplinary education. We also hope that the Directory will be useful to scholars and administrators who wish to know if and where certain sorts of interdisciplinary program exist.

The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies as an organization embraces the study and practice of interdisciplinarity in all of its forms. We had originally envisioned a Directory of all interdisciplinary programs. We limit ourselves, at least in this first effort, to the Liberal Arts, primarily because virtually all professional programs possess interdisciplinary elements. We will explore ways of identifying "self-consciously interdisciplinary" professional programs in the future. We also hope to extend the geographical scope of this Directory, and investigate whether certain types of Masters Degree programs can be included.

Guidelines for Use of the Directory
While we have striven for completeness, there will necessarily be some omissions in the list that follows; students are urged to consult websites of universities they would particularly wish to attend. In some cases, such as religious studies, applied ethics, and linguistics, it was particularly difficult to distinguish disciplinary from interdisciplinary programs.

The Directory can be explored in terms of type of interdisciplinary program, by clicking on one of the categories listed below. It is important to recognize that programs that fall within a narrowly defined category will usually not also be listed under the more general category. For example "Area Studies" programs are not also listed under the general "Social Sciences/Humanities" category.

We strongly encourage you to review the scope and criteria sections before using the directory. They provide important information on what types of program are included - or not included - in the Directory.

The Scope of the Directory
The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies as an organization embraces the study and practice of interdisciplinarity in all of its forms. We had originally envisioned a directory of all interdisciplinary programs. However, we have decided that, at least in our first effort, we will limit ourselves to interdisciplinary programs housed within Colleges of Arts and/or Sciences (or Colleges or Schools that cover all or part of the Liberal Arts). The primary reason for this is that professional programs, focused as they are on practical applications of theoretical knowledge, almost inevitably have interdisciplinary components. As Lisa Lattuca says (Creating interdisciplinarity : interdisciplinary research and teaching among college and university faculty, 2001, 60) "graduate study in professional fields is often geared to solving real world problems and is typically multidisciplinary, requiring individuals to complete courses taught from a variety of disciplinary perspectives." Since directories of professional programs already exist, we would provide unnecessary duplication if we listed all of these here. We do, though, think that there may be scope for identifying "self-consciously interdisciplinary" professional programs: those that make a particular effort to integrate different disciplinary perspectives; we invite suggestions on how we might proceed, and programs we might include, in such a directory.

We have also decided to focus in the first instance on the United States. We anticipate adding entries for Canadian programs in the very near future, and hope thereafter to survey other countries. We will also explore the possibility of adding certain types of Masters degree programs to our Directory.

What, though of (semi-) professional programs housed - or that could be housed - within Colleges of Arts and Science? We have included these here; they receive a designation of "Applied" in our classification system. While we have striven for consistency, it is likely that in some cases a program that is offered in a professional school is excluded even though the same program in an Arts or Science college would be included.

We have excluded all agricultural programs (including food science), for these are predominantly professional in nature. We have included Materials Science (and related fields such as ceramics) for this is often offered in Colleges of Science. We have also included Exercise Science, even though generally offered in Colleges of Physical Education.

Salter and Hearn (Outside the Lines: Issues in Interdisciplinary Research; 1996) distinguish "instrumental" interdisciplinarity, which focuses on particular problems, issues, or themes, from "conceptual" interdisciplinarity, which inquires into the nature of and queries the advisability of disciplinary structures. While much research is undertaken in conceptual interdisciplinarity, almost all of the PhD programs that we found were "instrumental". The two main exemplars of a "conceptual" approach are the "History of Consciousness" program at the University of California, Santa Cruz and the "Social Thought" program at the University of Chicago. Research of a conceptual nature is undoubtedly possible in other programs, especially some of those that embrace philosophy, sociology, or history, or those that allow students to suggest their own program.

Bill Newell has recently noted that interdisciplinarity can involve the integration not only of disciplines but of academic coursework with student services, residential life, and work experiences. A few of our PhD programs make explicit reference to some sort of work or life component; these programs are likely to be very integrative.

Criteria for Inclusion in the Directory
We have sought evidence of integration. That is, it is not enough that a program draws on more than one discipline; there must be a conscious effort to integrate disciplinary perspectives. It is, however, necessary that a program draw significantly upon more than one discipline: we have not included programs that integrate insights from sub-disciplines within the same discipline, though we appreciate that these are often truly integrative. By 'significantly' we mean programs that do more than just allow electives in diverse fields, but actually encompass more than one discipline within core coursework. We have judged the degree of integration from program websites, which are imperfect representations of a program's nature: we advise prospective students to seek programs that do more than simply require courses from different disciplines, but make an effort to integrate these perspectives.
This directory was developed by first compiling a list of all graduate programs and then removing those that were either clearly disciplinary or professional [see Scope of this Directory] in nature or insufficiently integrative. We have included in the directory most programs that mention more than one discipline in their title: the main exceptions to this rule of thumb occur in areas such as 'social psychology' which are generally taught within one discipline, or 'biochemistry' which is now generally recognized as a discipline or sub-discipline in its own right. Programs jointly administered by departments representing different disciplines were almost always included, as were programs administered by departments of a genuinely interdisciplinary nature. We have also looked closely at all 'Applied' degree programs, and included all that clearly applied insights from one discipline to the subject matter of another.

We have not included interdisciplinary specializations available within disciplinary degree programs. Most PhD programs allow students some scope for choosing elective courses outside of their core discipline. We have included a few interdisciplinary programs that can only be pursued in conjunction with a disciplinary PhD, where the degree of interdisciplinarity is great; we have made note of this restriction where applicable.

Having defined interdisciplinarity in terms of disciplines, we must then have a list of disciplines in mind. Since disciplinary/departmental structures evolve through time, there is no simple means of deciding what qualifies as a discipline at any point in time. We have, as noted above, treated biochemistry as a (sub-)discipline. We have treated Urban Studies in the same way. In the case of other programs, such as those in communications, Women's Studies, ethnic studies, and area studies, we have evaluated individual programs on a case-by-case basis.

A final criterion for inclusion deserves mention: the program must possess a website which could be readily accessed and in which the previous criteria could be assessed without excessive effort on the part of the Directory's compiler. In a few cases, it proved difficult or impossible to access the necessary information.

Individuals aware of a program that meets the criteria but is not included in the Directory are asked to contact AIS at aisorg@oakland.edu . We have learned of several valuable programs in this way since the Directory was first developed.

Acknowledgments
This directory was compiled by AIS Board President Rick Szostak, Professor of Economics at the University of Alberta. He was ably assisted by a committee of the AIS Board that included President Carolyn Haynes and Executive Director Bill Newell, both of Miami University of Ohio, Past President Joan Fiscella of the University of Illinois at Chicago, and Board member (and website expert) Sharon Cogdill of St. Cloud State. The committee thanks Rita Fisher, formerly of St. Cloud State, for great research assistance.

In 2005, Terri Patton, secretary of the Interdisciplinary Studies Program at Wayne State University, and others at WSU, on the advice of Stuart Henry, then Chair of the ISP, checked the links and replaced those that were no longer active. This important work was continued by Phyllis Cox, previous Office Manager of AIS.

Interdisciplinary PhD Programs

 Interdisciplinary PhD programs are particularly common in certain areas. We have striven to identify these. Note that programs listed in one of these categories will generally not also be listed in the more general categories that follow.

Natural Science Programs


Materials Science (includes Ceramics and Wood; see also Polymer Science)
Doctoral Program
Alabama A&M - Applied Physics; Material Science

Alfred University - Ceramic Engineering
Alfred University - Glass Science

Arizona State University - Materials Science and Engineering

Case Western Reserve University - Materials Science and Engineering

Colorado School of Mines - Materials Science
Colorado School of Mines - Applied Chemistry
Colorado School of Mines - Applied Physics

Cornell University - Materials Science and Engineering
Dartmouth College - Materials Science and Engineering
Duke University - Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
Iowa State University - Materials Science and Engineering
Lehigh University - Materials Science and Engineering
Pennsylvania State University - Materials Science and Engineering (Intercollege Program)
Tuskegee University - Materials Science and Engineering
University of Alabama - Materials Science (Tricampus Program)
University of California - Los Angeles - Materials Science and Engineering
University of California, San Diego - Materials Science and Engineering
University of California, Santa Barbara - Materials
University of Connecticut - Materials Science and Engineering
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Materials Science
University of Texas, Austin - Materials Science and Engineering
University of Vermont - Materials Science
University of Wisconsin, Madison - Materials Science (Interdisciplinary Degree of)
Washington State University - Materials Science (including Chemical Physics)

 
Social Science Programs




Natural and Social Science Programs

Environmental Studies
Doctoral Program

Duke University - Ecology
Duke University - Environmental Policy

New Jersey Institute of Technology - Environmental Science 
(Chemistry, Chemical Eng., Occupational Safety emphasis)
Old Dominion University - Ecological Sciences 
"An Interdisciplinary Degree Program of the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Ocean, Earth, and Atmospheric Sciences"
Pennsylvania State University - Ecology (Intercollegiate Program)
Tennessee Tech University - Environmental Sciences (seems to mix Biology and Chemistry)
University of California, Irvine - Planning, Policy, and Design (specialization in environmental policy)
University of California, Santa Barbara - Environmental Science and Management (can have disciplinary or multi-disciplinary specialization)
University of Florida - Ecology (Interdisciplinary Ecology Graduate Program)

Neuroscience and Cognitive Studies
Doctoral Program

Boston University - Cognitive and Neural Systems
Boston University - Biomedical Neuroscience
Boston University - Interdisciplinary Neuroscience
Boston University - Computational Neuroscience

Brandeis University - Neuroscience

Brown University - Cognitive, Linguistic, and Psychological Sciences
Brown University - Neuroscience

California Institute of Technology - Computation and Neural Systems
Carnegie Mellon University (with University of Pittsburgh) - Neural Basis of Cognition (Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition, a joint project of the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon, offers PhD program integrating Pittsburgh's strengths in basic and clinical neuroscience with Carnegie Mellon's in biology, computer science, psychology, and statistics)
Case Western Reserve University - Neurosciences
Central Michigan University - Neuroscience

Colorado State University - Molecular, Cellular, and Integrative Neurosciences
Colorado State University - Cognitive Neuroscience Psychology

Columbia University - Neurobiology and Behavior
Cornell University - Neurobiology and Behavior
Duke University - Neurobiology
George Mason University - Neuroscience
Indiana University - Cognitive Science (must be in conjunction with PhD in a discipline)
Iowa State University - Neuroscience
Johns Hopkins University - Cognitive Science
Kent State University - Biomedical Sciences (including neuroscience specialization)

Michigan State University - Cognitive Science (in conjunction with other depts.) 
Michigan State University - Neuroscience

Northwestern University Institute for Neuroscience (NUIN)
Pennsylvania State University - Neuroscience (within Medical School)
Princeton University - Neuroscience
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute - Cognitive Science
Ruters University - Neuroscience
State University of New York Downstate Medical Center - Neural and Behavioral Science
Stony Brook University (State University of New York) - Neuroscience ("multidisciplinary")
Tulane University - Neuroscience

University of Alabama at Birmingham - Behavioral Neuroscience

University of Arizona - Neuroscience
University of California, Berkeley - Neuroscience
University of California, Davis - Neuroscience
University of California, Irvine - Cognitive Sciences
University of California, Los Angeles - Neuroscience
University of California, Riverside - Neuroscience

University of California, San Diego - Cognitive Science 
University of California, San Diego - Neurosciences

University of Cincinnati - Neuroscience
University of Colorado, Boulder - Neuroscience
University of Florida - Neuroscience (Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical Sciences)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - Neuroscience
University of Iowa - Neuroscience
University of Kansas - Neurosciences
University of Maryland - Neuroscience and Cognitive Science
University of Maryland, Baltimore - Neuroscience
University of Miami - Neuroscience
University of Michigan - Neuroscience
University of Minnesota - Neuroscience
University of Missouri, Columbia - Interdisciplinary Neuroscience
University of Pennsylvania - Neuroscience

University of Rochester - Brain and Cognitive Sciences
University of Rochester Medical Center - Neuroscience

University of Southern California - Neuroscience
University of Tennessee, Memphis - Neuroscience
University of Texas, Austin - Neuroscience
University of Texas, Dallas - Cognition and Neuroscience
University of Utah - Neuroscience
University of Virginia - Neuroscience
University of Washington - Neurobiology and Behavior
University of Wisconsin, Madison - Neuroscience (also Neuroscience and Public Policy)
University of Wyoming - Neuroscience
Vanderbilt University - Neuroscience
Washington University, Saint Louis - Neuroscience
Yale University - Neuroscience



Textile Studies (see also Polymer Science)
Doctoral Program
Cornell University - Fiber Science and Apparel Design

University of Missouri, Columbia - Human Environmental Sciences (specializations in Family Studies, Human Development, Textiles, Nutrition, Environmental Design)



Social Science and Humanities Programs

Area Studies
Doctoral Program
Boston University - American Studies
Bowling Green State University - American Culture Studies
Brandeis University - Near Eastern & Judaic Studies

Brown University - Africana Studies
Brown University - American Studies
Brown University - Egyptology
Brown University - Portuguese & Brazilian Studies 
Brown University - French Studies 
[Brown has other area studies programs which seem to have a literary focus]

College of William and Mary - American Studies

Columbia University - East Asian Languages and Cultures
Columbia University - Middle Eastern, South Asian, and African Studies

Cornell University - German Studies
Cornell University - Near Eastern Studies 

Duke University - Classical Studies
Duke University - Romance Studies 
Duke University - German Studies (joint program with UNC Chapel Hill)

George Washington University - American Studies

Harvard University - African Studies
Harvard University - East Asian Languages and Civilizations (and other related combinations)
Harvard University - American Studies
Harvard University - Inner Asian and Altaic Studies 
Harvard University - Middle Eastern Studies (in conjunction with PhD in Economics, Anthropology, History, or Fine Art)
Harvard University - Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (various specializations, ancient and modern)
Harvard University - South Asian Studies

Howard University - African Studies

Indiana University - American Studies
Indiana University - Central Eurasian Studies
Indiana University - Germanic Studies

Louisiana State University - French Studies
New York University - French Studies

Princeton University - East Asian Studies
Princeton University - Near Eastern Studies (in conjunction with a department)

Purdue University - American Studies
Saint Louis University - American Studies
Stanford University - The Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages"brings together scholars and instructors dedicated to the study of foreign literatures, cultures, and languages from humanistic and interdisciplinary perspectives." Areas are Comparative Literature, French and Italian, German Studies, Iberian and Latin American Cultures, and Slavic Languages and Literatures.
Tulane University - Latin American Studies

University at Albany - Latin American, Caribbean, and U.S. Latino Studies

University at Buffalo - American Studies

University of California, Berkeley - Asian Studies
University of California, Berkeley - South and Southeast Asian Studies

University of California, Los Angeles - Asian Languages and Cultures (While most areas of specialization are 'languages and literature, it is possible to specialize in 'Buddhist Studies' and also 'cultural and comparative studies', which is designed to allow students with a primary focus on China, Japan, or Korea to incorporate comparative, interdisciplinary, and/or historical interests."

University of California, Los Angeles - Indo-European Studies (emphasis on linguistics but aims "to provide an integrated understanding of Indo-European culture, based on comparative linguistics, archaeology, social structure, religion, mythology, and poetics."

University of Chicago - East Asian Languages and Civilizations
University of Chicago - Germanic Studies

University of Hawaii - American Studies
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign - East Asian Languages and Cultures
University of Iowa - American Studies
University of Kansas - American Studies
University of Maryland - American Studies

University of Miami - International Studies: Latin American Studies

University of Michigan - American Culture 
University of Michigan - Asian Languages & Cultures
University of Michigan - Near Eastern Studies

University of Minnesota - American Studies
University of Minnesota - Classical and Near Eastern Studies

University of New Mexico - American Studies
University of New Mexico - Latin American Studies

University of Pennsylvania - East Asian Languages & Civilizations
University of Pennsylvania - Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations
University of Pennsylvania - South Asia Studies

University of Southern California - East Asian Languages and Cultures

University of Texas, Austin - Portfolio Programs allow students in a disciplinary Ph.D program to obtain credentials in interdisciplinary concentrations in Cultural Studies, Dispute Resolution, Gerontology, Interdisciplinary European Studies, Mexican American Studies, Philanthropy, Volunteerism and Nonprofit Management, Presidential Studies, Urban Studies, Women's and Gender Studies. 
University of Texas, Austin - American Studies 
University of Texas, Austin - Asian Studies 
University of Texas, Austin - Latin American Studies
University of Texas, Austin - Middle Eastern Studies

University of Utah - Middle East Studies (in conjunction with a department)
University of Washington - Near and Middle Eastern Studies

University of Wisconsin, Madison - Languages and Cultures of Asia
University of Wisconsin, Madison - Scandinavian Studies

Washington University, Saint Louis - Jewish, Islamic and Near Eastern Languages and Cultures (in conjunction with another department)

Yale University - American Studies
Yale University - Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations




Ethnic Studies; Studies of a particular religion
Doctoral Program
Boston College - Irish Studies (History or Literature focus)
Brandeis University - Near Eastern & Judaic Studies

Columbia University - Buddhist Studies 
Columbia University - Jewish Studies (in conjunction with various departments) 
Columbia University - Yiddish Studies

Harvard University - African American Studies
Temple University - African American Studies
University of Arizona - American Indian Studies

University of California, Berkeley - African American Studies
University of California, Berkeley - Ethnic Studies

University of California, Davis - Native American Studies

University of California, Los Angeles - Asian Languages and Cultures (While most areas of specialization are "languages and literature, it is possible to specialize in 'Buddhist Studies' and also 'cultural and comparative studies', which is designed to allow students with a primary focus on China, Japan, or Korea to incorporate comparative, interdisciplinary, and/or historical interests.")

University of California, Los Angeles - Indo-European Studies (emphasis on linguistics but aims "to provide an integrated understanding of Indo-European culture, based on comparative linguistics, archaeology, social structure, religion, mythology, and poetics.")

University of California, Los Angeles - Islamic Studies 

University of California, San Diego - Ethnic Studies

University of Chicago - Germanic Studies
University of Chicago - Jewish Studies (in conjunction with a department)

University of Illinois at Chicago - Hispanic (Interdisciplinary) Studies
University of Louisiana at Lafayette - Francophone Studies
University of Massachusetts - Afro-American Studies
University of Minnesota - Germanic (and Scandinavian) Studies
University of Nevada, Reno - Basque Studies
University of Texas, Austin - Germanic Studies
Yale University - African American Studies (in conjunction with a department)




Many interdisciplinary programs do not fit within the categories above. These have been classified as follows.

Natural Sciences (Programs that span two or more Natural Science disciplines)
Doctoral Program
Bowling Green State University - Photochemical Sciences (physics, biology, chemistry)

Brandeis University - Life Sciences (programs in Biochemistry and Biophysics; Molecular and Cell Biology; and Neuroscience)
Brandeis University - Quantitative Biology

California Institute of Technology - Biochemistry. & Molecular Biophysics
California Institute of Technology - Control & Dynamical Systems

Case Western Reserve University - Physiology & Biophysics
(Also PhD in Systems Integrated Physiology}

Case Western Reserve University - Macromolecular Science

Clemson University - Biosystems Engineering
Clemson University - Food Technology

Colorado School of Mines - Geochemistry
Colorado School of Mines - Geophysics

Columbia University - Chemical Physics 
Columbia University - Cellular, Molecular, and Biomedical Studies

Cornell University - Physiology, Biophysics & Systems Biology 

Drexel University - Physics
(including interdisciplinary concentrations such as astrophysics and biological physics)

Duke University - Structural Biology and Biophysics

Florida State University - Geophysical Fluid Dynamics
Florida State University - Molecular Biophysics "Molecular Biophysics (MOB) at Florida State University is a truly multi-disciplinary program uniting faculty and students from six departments (Biology, Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Nutrition, Food & Exercise Sciences, Mathematics and Physics), three colleges (Arts & Sciences, Human Sciences, and Engineering) and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory.

Harvard University - Biophysics
Harvard University - Chemical Physics 
Harvard University -  Earth and Planetary Sciences

Indiana University - Medical Biophysics Program in Bimolecular Imaging
Iowa State University - Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

Kent State University - Biomedical Sciences (including neuroscience specialization)
Kent State University - Chemical Physics (liquid crystals)

Michigan State University - Genetics

Ohio State University - Biophysics
Ohio State University - Cellular, Molecular, and Biochemical Sciences
Ohio State University - Chemistry-Biology Interface Program (CBIP)

Rutgers University - Computational Biology and Molecular Biophysics
Rutgers University - Computational and Integrative Biology (CCIB)

Texas Technological University - Environmental Toxicology
University of California, Berkeley - Biophysics

University of California, Davis - Biophysics (Biol, Physics, Chemistry, Engineering)
University of California, Davis - Biostatistics

University of California, San Diego - Bioinformatics (Interdisciplinary)
University of Chicago - Geophysical Sciences

University of Colorado, Boulder - Astrophysics and Planetary Sciences
University of Colorado, Boulder - Atmospheric and Oceanic Studies
University of Colorado, Boulder - Chemical Physics 
University of Colorado, Boulder - Geophysics (in conjunction with member departments)

University of Kansas - Environmental Engineering, and Environmental Science
University of Maryland - Chemical Physics
University of Minnesota - Chemical Physics
University of Nevada, Reno - Chemical Physics

University of North Carolina, Charlotte - Interdisciplinary Biology
University of North Carolina, Charlotte - Health Services Research

University of South Florida - Cancer Biology
University of Tulsa - Geophysics (Geochemistry)
University of Utah - Biological Chemistry
University of Virginia - Biophysics
University of Washington - Biological Physics, Structure and Design
University of Wisconsin, Madison - Biophysics
Yeshiva University - Biomedical Sciences

Applied Natural Sciences (Programs that apply the insights of one or more Natural Science disciplines to other disciplines)
Doctoral Program

Brigham Young University - Wildlife and Wildlands Conservation

Brown University - Applied Mathematics
Brown University - Computational Molecular Biology

California Institute of Technology - Applied & Computational Mathematics
California Institute of Technology - Applied Mechanics 
California Institute of Technology - Bioengineering
California Institute of Technology - Control & Dynamical Systems

California State University, Long Beach - Engineering & Industrial Applied Mathematics (with Claremont Colleges)
Case Western Reserve University - Applied Mathematics
Clemson University - Biosystems Engineering
College of William and Mary - Applied Science

Columbia University - Applied Mathematics
Columbia University - Applied Physics

Cornell University - Applied Mathematics
Cornell University - Applied Physics 
Cornell University - Theoretical and Applied Mechanics

Drexel University - Biomedical Engineering
Drexel University - Biomedical Science

Duke University - Biomedical Engineering
East Carolina University - Biomedical Physics
Emory University - Biological and Biomedical Sciences ("nine interdisciplinary doctoral programs")
George Mason University - Computational Sciences and Informatics (Applies computer science to various natural science specializations)

Massachussetts Institute of Technology - Medical Engineering and Medical Physics
(with Harvard University)

Northwestern University - Life and Biomedical Sciences (program includes 9 research clusters)
Ohio State University - Integrated Biomedical Science Program
Old Dominion University - Biomedical Sciences (biology, chemistry, psychology, exercise science, medicine)
Princeton University - Applied and Computational Mathematics
Rice University - Applied Physics

Tufts University - Chemistry/Biotechnology (chemistry department)
Tufts University - Biology/Biotechnology (biology department)
Tufts University - Chemical and Biological Engineering (biotechnology track)

University of Alabama at Birmingham - Vision Science
University of Alabama at Birmingham - Applied Mathematics

University of Arizona - Applied Mathematics
University of Arkansas, Little Rock - Space and Planetary Science

University of California, Berkeley - Applied Science and Technology
University of California, Berkeley - Vision Science

University of Kansas - Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences (IGPBS)
University of Maryland - Applied Mathematics and Statistics and Scientific Computation
University of New Mexico - Optical Science & Engineering
University of Texas, Austin - Computational Science, Engineering and Mathematics (CSEM)

University of Washington - Molecular and Cellular Biology (Interdisciplinary; focus on cancer)
University of Washington - Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Quantitative Ecology and Resource Management (QERM)

Wayne State University - Cancer Biology


Applied Social Sciences (Programs that apply the insights of one or more Social Science disciplines to other disciplines)
Doctoral Program
Antioch University - Leadership and Change
Baylor University - Applied Sociology
Binghamton University - Community and Public Affairs
Brandeis University - Social Policy (also joint degrees with Sociology and Women's and Gender Studies)
Central Michigan University - Applied-Experimental Psychology
Clemson University - Policy Studies
Colorado State University - Applied Social Psychology

Cornell University - Regional Planning
Cornell University - Regional Science 
Cornell University - Policy Analysis and Management

George Mason University - Environmental Science and Policy

Harvard University - Political Economy and Government
Harvard University - Social Policy

Nova Southeastern University - Conflict Analysis and Resolution

The George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Science - Translational Health Sciences

University of Arkansas, Little Rock - Public Policy
University of Maryland, Baltimore County - Public Policy
University of Massachusetts, Boston - Public Policy
University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill - Public Policy
University of North Carolina, Charlotte - Public Policy (Urban/Regional focus)
University of Oregon - Environmental Science, Studies, and Policy
University of Texas, Austin - Portfolio Programs allow students in a disciplinary PhD program to obtain credentials in interdisciplinary concentrations in Cultural Studies, Dispute Resolution, Gerontology, Interdisciplinary European Studies, Mexican American Studies, Philanthropy, Volunteerism and Nonprofit Management, Presidential Studies, Urban Studies, Women's and Gender Studies
Virginia Commonwealth University - Public Policy and Administration
Humanities (Programs that span two or more Humanities disciplines)
Doctoral Program
Ohio University - Interdisciplinary Arts
Salve Regina University - Humanities
University of Louisville - Humanities
University of Texas, Dallas - Humanities (students must take courses in the three areas of Aesthetic Studies, History of Ideas, and Studies in Literature)
Washington University, Saint Louis - Philosophy - Neuroscience - Psychology Note: "It is not a general cognitive science program, but a program designed to provide future professional philosophers with a understanding of the modes of inquiry and the empirical results and theoretical perspectives of psychology and the neurosciences."

Applied Humanities (Programs that apply the insights of one or more Humanities disciplines to other disciplines)
Doctoral Program
Brown University - Music (Ethnomusicology)
California Institute of Integral Studies - Transformative Studies
University of North Texas - Philosophy and Religion Studies

Natural Science/Social Science(Programs that span at least one Natural Science and at least one Social Science discipline)
Doctoral Program
Carnegie Mellon University - Human-computer Interaction
Colorado State University - Human Dimensions of Natural Resources

Columbia University - Sociomedical Sciences

Cornell University - Natural Resources
New Jersey Institute of Technology - Transportation
Pennsylvania State University - Integrative Biosciences
Tulane University - Aging Studies
University of Arizona - Arid Lands Resource Sciences
University of California, Berkeley - Energy and Resources
University of California, Davis - Transportation Technology and Policy
University of California, Irvine - Social Ecology
University of Chicago - Ecology and Evolution (Darwinian Studies) [also molecular bioscience, biomedical sciences]
University of Colorado, Denver - Health and Behavioral Sciences
University of Illinois at Chicago - Disability Studies
University of Kansas - Gerontology
University of Kentucky - Gerontology
University of Maryland, Baltimore - Gerontology
University of Massachusetts, Boston - Gerontology
University of Nebraska, Lincoln - Survey Research and Methodology
University of South Florida - Aging Studies
University of Texas, Austin - Portfolio Programs allow students in a disciplinary PhD program to obtain credentials in interdisciplinary concentrations in Cultural Studies, Dispute Resolution, Gerontology, Interdisciplinary European Studies, Mexican American Studies, Philanthropy, Volunteerism and Nonprofit Management, Presidential Studies, Urban Studies, Women's and Gender Studies.
University of the Sciences, Philadelphia - Health Policy
University of Wisconsin, Madison - Population Health
Western Michigan University - Interdisciplinary Health Sciences

Natural Science/Humanities(Programs that span at least one Natural Science and at least one Humanities discipline)
Doctoral Program
Drew University - Medical Humanities
Duquesne University - Health Care Ethics
University of California, Berkeley - Logic and the Methodology of Science (Philosophy, Math, Computer Science)

Social Science/Humanities (Programs that span at least one Humanities and at least one Social Science discipline)
Doctoral Program
Baylor University - Religion

Columbia University - Comparative Literature and Society

Duquesne University - Rhetoric (Communication)

Emory University - "Study of Culture and Society" (Institute of the Liberal Arts)
Emory University - Religion

Florida Atlantic University - Comparative Studies "interdisciplinary program for students interested in an advanced general education and life as a public intellectual."
New York University - Performance Studies
Union Institute & University - Ethical & Creative Leadership, Public Policy & Social Change, and Humanities & Culture
University of California, Berkeley - Jurisprudence & Social Policy
University of California, Los Angeles - Ethnomusicology
University of California, San Diego - Comparative Studies in Language Society and Culture
University of Denver - Religious and Theological Studies (with Iliff School of Theology) Includes psychology, social change, cultural theory.
University of Hawaii - Communication and Information Sciences
University of Maryland, Baltimore County - Language, Literacy, and Culture
University of Texas, Austin - Portfolio Programs allow students in a disciplinary PhD program to obtain credentials in interdisciplinary concentrations in Cultural Studies, Dispute Resolution, Gerontology, Interdisciplinary European Studies, Mexican American Studies, Philanthropy, Volunteerism and Nonprofit Management, Presidential Studies, Urban Studies, and Women's and Gender Studies.
Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University - ASPECT (Alliance for Social, Political, Ethical, and Cultural Thought)

Natural Science/Social Science/Humanities (Programs that span at least one Natural Science, one Social Science, and one Humanities discipline)
Doctoral Program
Portland State University - Systems Science "Systems Science is the study and application of general methods of problem solving and general principles governing systems of widely differing types."

Natural Science/Social Science/Humanities/Self-designed (Programs that span at least one Natural Science, one Social Science, one Humanities, and one self-designed discipline)
Doctoral Program
University of California, Santa Cruz - History of Consciousness "History of consciousness is an interdisciplinary graduate program centered in the humanities with links to the social sciences, natural sciences, and the arts. It is concerned with forms of human expression and social action as they are manifested in specific historical, cultural, and political contexts. The program stresses flexibility and originality. "the curriculum concentrates on methodological and theoretical issues and is concerned with the integration of disciplines"
Self-designed PhD programs (Programs that allow students to develop a program that spans two or more disciplines)
Doctoral Program
Bowling Green State University - Interdisciplinary Studies
California Institute of Integral Studies - Transformative Studies
Dalhousie University - Interdisciplinary Doctorate
Emory University - The Graduate Institute of the Liberal Arts (ILA) is Emory University's institutional center for comparative and interdisciplinary studies across the social sciences and humanities."
Marquette University - Interdisciplinary PhD
Michigan State University - Dual PhD. "Michigan State University offers doctoral students the exceptional opportunity to work in conjunction with faculty mentors to develop a dual major doctoral program. Such a program will reflect the required courses and standards for both of the departments with a single dissertation."
Prescott College - Limited Residency PhD Program in Sustainability Education
Tufts University - Interdisciplinary Doctorate
University of Chicago - Social Thought "the serious study of any academic topic, or of any philosophical or literary work, is best prepared for by a wide and deep acquaintance with the fundamental issues presupposed in all such studies, that students should learn about these issues by acquainting themselves with a select number of classic ancient and modern texts in an inter- or trans-disciplinary atmosphere" "The primary themes of the Committee's intellectual life have continued to be literature, philosophy, history, religion, art, politics, and society."
University of Missouri, Kansas City - Interdisciplinary PhD
This program is not just permissive, but extends across all disciplines and is guided by a set of principles.
University of Montana - Interdisciplinary Studies
University of Texas, Austin - ad hoc Interdisciplinary PhD (must first be admitted to current PhD program)
University of Washington - Individual PhD
Vanderbilt University - Individualized Interdisciplinary PhD (Information found in pdf on Academic Programs/Special Programs)
Washington State University - Individual Interdisciplinary

This directory was compiled and the supplementary text written by Dr. Rick Szostak of the University of Alberta. If you have questions or would like to have your program considered for inclusion in the AIS Directory of Interdisciplinary Doctoral programs, please contact AIS at aisorg@oakland.edu.

For even more helpful information, visit the "Ph.D. Resources" website put together by the University of Washington and the Pew Charitable Trust. This is a survival guide to doctoral graduate study which includes tips on selecting an advisor and committee, preparing for qualifying exams, publishing and writing the dissertation.
Master's
Program
Directory

INTENTIONALLY INTERDISCIPLINARY: Master’s Interdisciplinary Program Directory
2nd Edition, Fall 2011 

Authored by Jordan Hill, Ph.D.
Masters of Humanities/Master of Social Science (MHMSS) Program
University of Colorado Denver
Jordan.Hill@ucdenver.edu

The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies is proud once again to continue our tradition of supporting and publishing surveys of interdisciplinary programs. Following in the footsteps of Alan F. Edwards' Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs: A Directory, and Rick Szostak’s Interdisciplinary Doctoral Program Directory, we first presented another piece of the interdisciplinary academic landscape with the publication in Fall 2008 of Jordan Hill's Master's Program Directory. We are now pleased to offer you this updated edition of Jordan Hill's Intentionally Interdisciplinary: Master’s Interdisciplinary Program Directory, 2nd Edition, Fall 2011. The author would like to acknowledge Naropa University for the generous Research Fellowship that made this directory possible.

The Association for Interdisciplinary Studies hopes that this Directory will aid prospective graduate students who are seeking information on interdisciplinary graduate education. We also hope that the Directory will be useful to scholars and administrators who wish to know if and where certain sorts of interdisciplinary program exist.

Like the Doctoral Directory, the Master’s Directory provides links to the websites of all the listed programs. In addition to this, we have provided two different ways to search the directory: geographically by state, and also by program type. There is also a new classification system called the "Program Path" being used in this directory that we hope will help users of the directory to compare and gain insights into the various structures of Master’s level interdisciplinary study. We strongly encourage you to read through the "Introduction" (see link below) in order to familiarize yourself with the structure and unique concepts being used in this directory.

Introduction
Before accessing the directory for the first time, we suggest that you read the introduction in its entirety simply by scrolling through the page. However, later you may want to use the links to “jump” to a section of your choice.

Preface to the 2nd Edition

The 2nd Edition of Intentionally Interdisciplinary, published in the fall of 2011, is proud to build upon the three years of experience and feedback that both the author and AIS as an organization have learned about the state of interdisciplinary studies at the Master’s level since the publication of the 1st edition in the fall of 2008. Over this period we have established a streamlined application process for programs that wish to be added to the directory, and this has resulted in the addition of dozens of new and revised program entries. Throughout the summer of 2011, AIS Office Manager Phyllis Cox and the author did a complete overhaul of the directory to check for broken web links, contact new faculty and program directors, alter contact information and identify any change in a program’s affiliation within their home institutions. As a result the directory not only brings information up to date on programs included in the first edition, it also adds a variety of a new online programs. We at AIS would like to welcome you to the directory and are confident that whether you are an administrator, faculty member, and/or a current or prospective graduate student, that this directory will help you to identify and locate with ease the kind of graduate interdisciplinary programs that you are looking for.

Guidelines

Our objective is to maintain a directory that provides not only up-to-date but comprehensive coverage of Master's level interdisciplinary education, but programs will continue to change and new programs will get started. We invite any new program that feels it meets the criteria for inclusion, but was not included in the directory, to submit a request for inclusion at AIS at aisorg@oakland.edu. Likewise, we ask included programs to notify AIS of any changes that require adjusting their entry

In order to facilitate quick access for a wide array of users, this directory can be searched in two different ways. First, following in the footsteps of Alan F. Edwards Jr.’s undergraduate directory (also sponsored by AIS), this directory has been organized alphabetically by state to help students looking for programs in a certain area and for scholars who are interested in comparing programs regionally. Second, the directory can be searched by three overarching program classifications: “Masters of Interdisciplinary Studies (MAIS),” “Master of Liberal Studies/Liberal Arts (MALS),” and “All Other Interdisciplinary Programs.” Lastly, the directory can be searched regionally by state. It is also suggested that users of this directory familiarize themselves with the “Program Path” (see below) method of classification, as this is an informal but useful new method of finding programs that are similar in structure.

You are strongly encouraged to review the Scope, Criteria and Format sections of this introduction before moving on to the Directory. These sections will provide you with the information necessary to most effectively navigate the Directory and the programs that are included and excluded from its pages.

The Scope of this Directory

The initial research for this directory was done in the summer of 2007 through the summer of 2008. During this time over 400 hours of research and compilation were put into this project, and over 300 different programs were researched and assessed for compatibility with the criteria for inclusion in the Directory (see below). In the end, the first edition of the directory included nearly 200 different programs spread across forty-four different states. The second edition has over 200 programs, which is the result of both the addition of new programs and the disappearance and/or failure to maintain the criteria of “interdisciplinary education” for some programs that were featured in the first edition.

This directory differs in one major way from the AIS online Doctoral Program in that it is not limited solely to “programs housed within Colleges of Arts and/or Sciences,” but rather includes interdisciplinary Master’s degrees in all fields as long as they meet the stated criteria for inclusion.

The Criteria for Inclusion in the Directory

I have sought out programs that are intentionally interdisciplinary. There are three factors that have come to define what is meant by “intentional” in this directory. First, this means that the program acknowledges its own interdisciplinarity openly. Programs that did not claim to be interdisciplinary in nature, regardless of my opinion of their structure, were not included or investigated in the process of compiling this directory. Secondly, I have sought out evidence of integration as an embodiment of the level of the program's intentionality. My research has illuminated that Master’s level interdisciplinary programs, as would logically be expected, fall somewhere in between the entry level of integration found in undergraduate programs (see Alan F. Edwards, Jr.’s Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs: A Directory, Second Edition) and advanced and explicit level of integration found in PhD programs (see Rick Szostak’s Doctoral Program Directory at http://www.units.muohio.edu/aisorg/Resources/doctoral_programs.shtml ). This directory has thus sought out programs that seek to integrate insights from disciplinary perspectives, as well as drawing intentionally upon more than one perspective. In some programs this level of integration is significant, while in other programs this is not necessarily the case. The level of integration found in each program is most clearly articulated in the third and final factor of this directory’s intentionality, the Program Path system of classification (see ‘Format’ below for more detailed information).

Following in the footsteps of the PhD directory, this directory includes only programs that have a website or a web link to information about the program. This particular factor was not merely an element of the criteria for inclusion, but was in fact the method of research itself. A number of Internet search engines were used to initiate the compilation process, and out of this grew, quite literally, a web of interdisciplinary connections (see “Search Criteria” below). Many programs linked to other programs, organizations, or interdisciplinary faculty that helped to grow and expand this web. The end result of this method of research is that this selective directory can nevertheless be said to be a comprehensive directory of intentionally structured Master’s level interdisciplinary programs that are listed on the Internet.

The Format of the Survey Used in the Directory

The survey used in this directory has five sections:
  1. Basic Information
  2. Program Path
  3. Program Structure
  4. Program Statistics
  5. Contact Information
Most of the information contained in this survey is straightforward. The template that was used as the starting point for creating the survey was Alan F. Edwards, Jr.’s, Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs: A Directory, Second Edition, published under the guidance of then Association for Integrative Studies (AIS). The criteria used in Edwards’s directory are the following:
  • University Name
  • Program Name
  • Type
  • Size
  • Courses
  • Administration
  • Narrative
  • Contact
All of these criteria, except for “Size” and “Administration,” were used in this graduate directory, although the names of some of these criteria have been changed (example: “Narrative” is “Description” in this directory).

In addition to these basic criteria, the ‘Program Path’ section was created to tailor this directory specifically to graduate interdisciplinary Master’s programs, and are explained in more detail below. (See below, in ‘Background on the New Elements in this Directory’ for a short narrative on how this new section was created.)

Section 1: Basic Information

The basic information for each interdisciplinary program is the only section of the survey that is not specifically labeled (i.e., there is not a heading of “Basic Information” on the survey itself). The basic information is quite straightforward and includes the following:
  • UNIVERSITY NAME & (State)
    At the top of each page is the name of the university, in bold CAPITALS, followed by the name of the State, in parentheses.
    Example: STANFORD UNIVERSITY (California)

  • Program Name & (Program Acronym)
    The name of the interdisciplinary program offered at the school in bold, followed by the acronym for the program name (some programs do not use an acronym).
    Example: Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies (MAIS)
Section 2: The Program Path

The Program Path section of this directory is a new form of classification that grew organically out of the process of researching and compiling this directory and is composed of two parts: the ‘Interdisciplinary Type’ (IDS Type), and the ‘Program Type.’ These Program Path classifications were developed with two underlying goals in mind. The Program Path was envisioned from a uniquely student perspective as a way of extracting the most important aspects of each program for the prospective student, while at the same time striving to offer valuable comparative and classification information for the interdisciplinary scholar. The Program Path also serves as the method for clarifying how the survey itself defines the intentionality of each program (see ‘Criteria’ above).

Interdisciplinary Type (IDS Type): An overarching classification that deals with a student’s access to graduate level courses at the university.

  • Unrestricted IDS: Unrestricted IDS programs are programs where the student has access to 100% of the graduate level courses offered at a given university. The inspiration for labeling this “Unrestricted” IDS is based on the premise that somewhere there is a student who can see the connection between a course on aeronautical engineering and a course on Victorian literature. It is only in an Unrestricted IDS program that this student would have full and unfettered access to both of these courses. Unrestricted IDS programs acknowledge that there are no limits to the possibilities of interdisciplinarity, and as such they do not attempt to limit, in any way, the access of students to realizing their interdisciplinary vision. It is important to note that the Unrestricted IDS designation is not a commentary on the prerequisites or required faculty approval that a given course may have, it merely acknowledges that with the necessary clearance a student has access to the complete offerings of the universities' graduate course offerings.

  • Departmentally Restricted IDS: Departmentally Restricted IDS programs are programs that limit a student’s access to graduate coursework to certain departments at the university. This is not to say that students in a Departmentally Restricted IDS program might not have access to literally thousands of classes at the university, but nevertheless they would be restricted from at least a handful of the offered courses. It is also important to note that a Departmentally Restricted IDS designation is in no way a comment on the quality of the program itself. There are dozens of very high quality interdisciplinary programs of this sort that offer many opportunities to construct an interdisciplinary Master’s degree of the highest caliber. As a general observation, a majority of the Departmentally Restricted IDS programs appear to be contained in graduate schools of Arts and Sciences. At some schools this can be over twenty departments with tens to hundreds of course offerings in each department. My research also points to the possibility that the “Departmentally Restricted IDS” designation may in fact be more of a comment on the university as a whole being in a stage of “testing the waters” of interdisciplinarity, and thus not yet being comfortable with the prospect of a program that completely breaks down the boundaries of single-discipline inquiry. From this viewpoint, it seems likely that in the coming years many of these programs may prove their merit to their respective university administrations and expand to become unrestricted—and hence—Unrestricted IDS programs.
Program Type: A classification that specifically addresses whether students are open, limited, or blocked from arranging their schedule of courses throughout the duration of the program. In this way, the Program Type offers a commentary on what kind of interdisciplinary journey the program itself offers.
  • Fixed IDS Program: Fixed Interdisciplinarity (IDS) is a program in which all (or virtually all) of the coursework in the program is predetermined and the students are not given any leeway in choosing their courses. This kind of program is the least common, which is likely due to the multifaceted and individually unique nature of interdisciplinarity in general. This being said, there are a few examples of universities that have quality Fixed programs in this directory.

  • Foundational IDS Program: Foundational Interdisciplinarity (IDS) is a program that requires students to take one or more classes at the beginning of their study in order to build an interdisciplinary foundation of inquiry and understanding on which to build their unique version of the program. This kind of program is the most common, and the foundational courses included in this kind of program are often called Gateway courses or Proseminars. In general, a Foundational IDS program is beneficial in that it provides a student who is unfamiliar with interdisciplinary study an overview of the methods, terminology and attributes of interdisciplinarity. A genuinely Foundational IDS program works to integrate the knowledge of multiple disciplines by teaching about interdisciplinarity itself. That being said, the author acknowledges the possibility that programs included in this directory may have advertised themselves as Foundational programs on their website, but are in actuality only introducing students to the theme of their program in their foundational courses. For this reason it is suggested that this directory be used as a starting point, and that prospective students or interested educators contact the program directly to discern for themselves whether or not the program sufficiently prepares students to integrate knowledge from the disciplines.

  • Floating IDS Program: Floating Interdisciplinarity (IDS) is a program that has no set course requirement and thus allows students to pick all of their own coursework. This does not mean that students are completely free to take whatever they want without restriction, because every program has certain program requirements, such as a required consultation with an advisor in choosing a plan of study and/or a certain number of credits required in concentrations of the student’s choice. Nevertheless, once all of the program requirements in a Floating IDS program are met, students are free to take any courses they meet the prerequisites for and there are no set “required” courses. The major difference between a Foundational and Floating IDS program is the absence of any required introductory interdisciplinary courses in the Floating program. The Floating IDS programs represent the middleman in this directory, as they are more prevalent than Fixed IDS programs but less common than Foundational IDS programs.
Description: The Description is an explanation of the IDS program from the university itself. Commonly this information was taken from the program's website or informational brochure. The source of the program description is included at the end of the text.
  • Example: Stanford University Master of Liberal Arts
    • Description: Return to Chaucer's England. Explore emerging issues in bioethics. Contemplate the cross-cultural role of the public intellectual. Investigate the politics of diversity and unity in the United States. Whatever your interests, Stanford University's Master of Liberal Arts offers an extraordinary opportunity to earn your master's degree at one of the world's great centers of learning. Designed with working adults in mind, this part-time graduate degree program holds classes in the evenings and offers a flexible academic schedule. (From website.)
*An important note on the relation of IDS Type and Program Type: It is important to note the Program Path possibilities that result from including both classifications in the survey of each university's program. Due to the fact that there are two (2) options under the “IDS Type” classification and three (3) options under the “Program Type” classification, what emerges is that there are six (6) possible Program Paths that any one university’s interdisciplinary program can fall under. For example, The Ohio State University’s “Master of Arts in Comparative Studies” is an Unrestricted/Foundational IDS program while nearby Ohio University’s “M.A. or M.S. in Individual Interdisciplinary Program” is a Fully IDS/Floating IDS program. There are two points to clarify about this structure of the Program Path:

  • First, the “IDS Type” and “Program Type” are completely independent, meaning that information about one of these categories does not necessarily give you any information about the other category. 

  • Second, each of the six different Program Paths is in essence its own kind of interdisciplinary study, with its own unique attributes and restrictions. Thus, programs that have the same Program Path (e.g. Departmentally Restricted IDS /Foundational IDS) are of a similar interdisciplinary nature. This can aid prospective students and interested scholars alike in their inquiry, as programs with the same Program Path classification will likely have many common attributes with other programs of the same classification. It is not the place of this particular piece to discuss the attributes, strengths, and weaknesses of each Program Path, although the author acknowledges that such a discussion would provide a great deal of valuable information and deeper understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of academic programs.
Section 3: Program Structure

The Program Structure is the section of the survey that gives information about applying to and being a student in the program itself. The information contained in this section is specifically organized to allow the reader, both the prospective graduate student and the academic, an opportunity to see inside each program and to facilitate an easy quantitative comparison of one program to another.

If the Program Path section can be said to be the intentionally interdisciplinary section of the survey, then the Program Structure section is the nuts and bolts of the programs themselves.

  • Admission Requirements: The Admission Requirements are exactly that, things that applicants are required to do for admission into the program. Let us quickly look into the most common requirements.

    • Application: The application is the paperwork required for applying to the program. There are a few programs that have online-only applications, but most programs provide links to download and print a hard copy of the application to be mailed to the university upon completion of the admission requirements.
    • Official Undergraduate Transcripts: Most universities require official sealed copies of transcripts from all previous academic institutions attended. A few programs allow unofficial copies. In reference to Grade Point Average (GPA) specifically, I have decided not to include in the survey any information about required GPA’s because most programs that have required GPA’s also offer the opportunity for students to be granted “conditional acceptance” for a semester or a year in order to prove their qualifications for graduate study, assuming all the other elements of their application are of sufficient quality. Please visit the program’s website for up-to-date information on GPA requirements.
    • Resumé: This requirement is referred to as either a resumé or CV (curriculum vitae). A graduate admission resume should include a complete listing of the applicant’s educational, work related, and practical experience.
    • Statement of Purpose: This requirement is variously referred to as a statement of purpose, statement of intent, or proposed program goals. This requirement is common for master’s level interdisciplinary programs. Applicants must provide a brief summary of why they are interested in interdisciplinary study, what disciplines they want to pursue, and how they plan to integrate this work in an academically relevant way. If the program has a page or word count/page count requirement for the statement of purpose, that is included in parentheses (e.g. “2-3 pages”)
    • Plan of Study: The Plan of Study is an outline of the classes that a student plans to take, listed term by term, for the entirety of the program. There are a small handful of programs that require prospective students to complete this during the application process (i.e., before having been accepted to the program itself). Each of the programs have a specific way they want the Plan of Study to be laid out, so consulting the website or contacting the department directly is essential for completing this requirement in the correct manner. Most programs require the Plan of Study be completed after the student has been accepted into the program, usually within the first year of attendance. Every program that requires a Plan of Study offers faculty advisors for assisting in this process.
    • Writing Sample: Schools that require a Writing Sample are looking for a paper that illustrates the applicant’s potential for graduate level work. The submission of a quality paper completed in an upper division undergraduate course is the most common suggestion for fulfilling this requirement. A few programs ask for an essay on a question they provide and in these cases one must consult the website for the most current requirements. When the program provides information about this element, it is included in parentheses.
    • Example: (5-10 pages) OR (Essay based on question)
    • GRE: The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) is required by some programs and optional for others. 
    • Letters of Recommendation: A majority of the programs require one to three letters of recommendation from previous professors or other persons who are familiar with the applicant’s ability to engage in graduate level study. Many programs have forms for letters of recommendation that are available for download on the program website. The most common form of submission is for the professor to complete the letter, seal it, and send it directly to university without showing it to the applicant. Unsealed letters are traditionally frowned upon, and in most instances, not allowed.
    • Interview: Some schools require an interview as a way of discussing with prospective students their plans and intentions for graduate level interdisciplinary study. The interview is an opportunity for students to ask questions about the program and to determine if the program offers the courses necessary to successfully pursue their interdisciplinary plans. The interview also allows the faculty member the opportunity to determine if the student’s plans are in line with the school’s IDS program. The interviews are preferably conducted in person with the Program Director or other IDS faculty member, but phone interviews are normally available for students who do not live in the area.

  • Prerequisites: A prerequisite differs from an admission requirement in that it is not something the applicant must do or submit, but something that they must have in order to apply for the program, such as a certain kind of undergraduate degree. The most obvious prerequisite for graduate study is a Bachelor’s degree, but because every program in this directory requires that the applicant have this degree (at a minimum), this particular prerequisite is not included in the survey itself. Having excluded the Bachelor’s degree, there are very few programs with prerequisites and thus this element is included only for programs that have other kinds of prerequisites.

    Example: College-level algebra/3 credits of statistics or calculus

  • Credit Hours: The minimum number of credits required for completing the degree.

    Example: 48 credits

  • Required Coursework: Coursework that is required for completion of the degree. Examples of this are core courses and required IDS electives. This relates to the Program Path in that all (or virtually all) courses in a “Fixed” program are required, some courses in a “Foundational” program are required, and no courses in a “Floating” program are required. Exit courses and work are not included under this heading, as they have their own heading below. The format for this element and the next two elements is: number of credits, number and type of courses

    Example: 6 credits, Two Core courses

  • Individually Selected Coursework: Individually selected coursework is coursework that is chosen by students to fulfill their interdisciplinary goals in various disciplinary departments. Simply put, these courses are electives. Most programs have guidelines for how this coursework must be organized (such as into “areas of concentration”), but nevertheless, individual students choose their own courses once the guidelines are met.

    Example: 18 credits, Six Electives

  • Exit Courses & Work: Exit courses and work covers all coursework, final projects, and papers required for completion of the degree. Technically speaking, this element is “required,” but has been separated from the “Required Coursework” section for the purpose of clarity. Most graduate programs require certain courses in preparation for and/or to provide time for the completion of a thesis or final project, and this element is where that information is included.

    Example: 3 credits, Capstone Thesis Project

  • Available Departments: The Available Departments element is directly related to the “IDS Type.” In this element, “True IDS” programs are labeled as “Open” because every department is open to a student in this type of program. On the other hand, every department or school available to a student in a “Departmentally Restricted” program is listed in this element.

    Example: “Open” OR “All departments in the School or Arts and Sciences”
Section 4: Program Statistics

The Program Statistics is the section of the survey that provides information about the program’s faculty, the types of possible enrollment for students, and the longevity of the program itself.
  • Faculty Info: The Faculty Info element provides information about the number of faculty members in the program, and the number of faculty members associated with the program. If no information was provided this section will state, “No IDS faculty information available.”

    Example: 4 department faculty members, 34 associate faculty members

  • Student Info: The Student Info element provides information on whether the program accepts resident students only or has the capacity to admit distance-learning students and, where applicable, it designates whether the program caters to or is designed specifically for part-time students.

    Example: Resident students only, Program designed for part-time students.

  • Program History: The Program History element provides information on when the program was established at the university. If no information was provided this section will state, “No information available.”

    Example: Program established in 1989
Section 5: Contact Information

The Contact Information section provides four ways of getting in touch with the program directly.
  • Address: The mailing address of the IDS department is provided if possible. Otherwise the next best thing, such as the mailing address of the graduate school at the university.
  • Phone Numbers: The phone number(s) of the IDS department.
  • Email: The email address(es) for the IDS department. Every attempt was made to use a departmental email address and not the email address of a faculty member in the department because of the fact that faculty members transfer and the goal of this directory is to give the user the most reliable and long lasting contact information possible.
  • Website: The link for the IDS department’s website. Users of this directory are encouraged to check the website first as information may have changed or been pdated since the time this directory was compiled.
Background on the New Elements in this Directory

Looking back over the time I spent developing and testing the survey that I used to compile this directory of interdisciplinary graduate programs, I can now see that there were two distinct parts of this process. The first and most obvious part was the inclusion of the necessary information that any survey must have to be useful to its target audience. The second part of developing the survey was the creation of new categories of classification specifically suited for arranging the unique structure of Master’s level interdisciplinary programs, which I call the ‘Program Path.’

It seems pertinent to explain briefly how the ‘Program Path’ classification arose. In the Spring of 2007, when the idea for a master's level interdisciplinary studies program directory first came into being, I had a number of conversations with the Chair of Naropa University’s Interdisciplinary Studies Program, Alan Hartway. In these discussions we talked not only about the necessary information for a directory of master's level interdisciplinary programs, but we also began to dialogue about the sense that there were different kinds of interdisciplinary programs, which after a number of discussions we defined as three distinct categories, with the work-in-progress titles of ‘Tract,’ ‘Gateway/Capstone,’ and ‘Open.’ This classification evolved into what has become the ‘Program Type,’ section of the survey. In the final version, the component parts of the ‘Program Type’ are called Fixed, Foundational, and Floating.

When I began my research these three classifications were the main criteria I was using to differentiate programs, but after completing approximately fifty program surveys, I noticed that each program had not only a Program Type, but also the distinction of having open or restricted access to registration in the university’s graduate courses. This distinction, which encompasses the Program Type, is referred to in the survey as the ‘Interdisciplinary Type’ (IDS Type).

Search Criteria for this Directory

Based upon the finite graduate assistantship that funded this research, the terms “interdisciplinary” and “liberal studies” comprised the bulk of my directed inquiry for this directory. Nevertheless, in the process of preparing to research and compile this directory, Julie Thompson Klein’s Crossing Boundaries: Knowledge, Disciplinarities, and Interdisciplinarities helped me to understand the expanse and breadth of terms that relate to interdisciplinarity. I began to take notes of the synonyms, subfields, and keywords that related to interdisciplinarity, and these terms formed the foundation upon which I conducted my Internet research. From the first day of my research, I continually referenced this list in order to expand the reach of the directory as far as the criteria for inclusion would allow.

Interdisciplinary Synonyms
  • Matrix Structure (Klein, 23)
  • Trading Zones (Klein, 22)
    • Pidgin zones
    • Creole zones
  • Holism (Klein, 13)
  • Transdisciplinary (Klein, 11)
  • Mode 2 learning (Klein, 24)
  • Humanities centers (Klein, 30)
  • Advanced Studies (Klein, 31)
  • Multidisciplinary (Klein, 33)
    • General and liberal education
    • Specific field of knowledge
  • Capstone seminars (Klein, 33)
  • Interrelation (Klein, 41)
  • Multivariate discipline (Klein, 41)
  • Crossroads science (Klein, 41)
  • Circulation (Klein, 51)
  • Wittgenstein’s “Familial Resemblances” (Klein, 70)
  • “New History” (Klein, 71)
  • Hybrid Specialties
  • Nice nonsense (Klein, 78)
  • “STS” Science, Technology & Society (Klein, 99)
  • Culture Studies (Klein, 125)
  • Cultural Studies
  • Theoretical Studies
  • History of Consciousness
  • Plural Studies
  • Cultural Theory
  • American Studies (Klein, 163-167)
  • Transdisciplinarity
Interdisciplinary Subfields
  • International studies (Klein, 33)
  • American multicultural studies
  • Gender studies
  • Historical consciousness
  • Ethical understanding
  • Peace and Conflict studies (Klein, 34)
  • Computer and Information Studies
  • Cognitive science
  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Global Studies
  • Urban studies (Klein, 37) (also p. 88-96)
  • Environmental studies (also p. 96-101)
  • Borderland studies
  • Area studies
  • Women’s studies
  • Cultural studies
  • Ecological concepts (Klein, 40)
  • Systems theory
  • Contingency models
  • Geography (Klein, 40-41)
    • Origins
      • US—geology, history, anthropology
      • Germany—earth science
      • France—history
      • UK—managing empire
    • Geography Subfields (Klein, 41)
    • Regional geography
    • Biogeography
    • Geomorphology
    • Climatology
    • Environmental science
    • Cartography
  • Chicano Urban History (Klein, 58)
  • Plate Tectonics
  • Criminology (Klein, 59)
  • Social psychology (Klein, 79)
    • Psychological social psychology (80)
    • Symbolic interactionism
    • Psychological sociology
  • Molecular Biology (Klein, 81)
  • Biochemistry
  • Border studies (Klein, 101-107)
  • Area studies (Klein, 107-115)
  • Women’s studies /Gender studies (Klein, 115-123)
  • Culture studies (Klein, 123-132)
    • List of subfields on p.124-125)
    • Synopsis on p.130
  • Literary studies (Klein, Chapter 5)
  • Hermeneutics (Klein, 141)
  • Phenomenology
  • Structuralism (Klein, 141-142)
  • Theory ((142-145)
  • Semiotics
  • Social History
  • Feminism
  • Lacanian analysis
  • Poststructuralism
  • Literary Period studies (Klein, 155-58)
    • Victorian
    • Eighteenth Century
  • Interarts (Klein, 159)
    • Comparative Arts
    • Interdisciplinary Arts
    • Interart
    • Analogies
    • Mutual Illumination
    • Interrelationships
  • American studies (Klein, 163-167)
Interdisciplinary Keywords
  • Negotiation (Klein, 129)
  • Intervention
  • Transgression
  • Bricolage
  • Interplay (Klein, 147)
  • Inherent ties
  • Reciprocal process
  • Interpenetration
  • Interaction
  • Symmetries
  • Symbiotic
  • Complementary relationships
  • Extraliterary
  • Integrations (Klein, 213)
    • Differentiating
    • Comparing
    • Contrasting
    • Relating
    • Clarifying
    • Reconciling
    • Synthesizing
Acronyms Used in the Directory
  • AIS Association for Interdisciplinary Studies
  • AGLSP Association of Graduate Liberal Studies Program
  • CCT Communication, Culture and Technology
  • GCS Gender/Cultural Studies
  • IAS Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies
  • IDS Interdisciplinary Studies (primary usage in this text)
  • IGS Interdisciplinary Graduate Studies
  • IIP Individual Interdisciplinary Program
  • ILPS Individualized Liberal and Professional Studies (Master of Arts)
  • IMAP Individualized Master of Arts Program
  • INO Individual Option (Program)
  • INTD Interdisciplinary Studies
  • IS Integrative Studies
  • ITDS Interdisciplinary Studies
  • LIBA Liberal Arts
  • LSM Master of Arts in Liberal Studies
  • LSMA Master of Arts in Liberal Studies
  • LSS Liberal Studies Track
  • MA Master of Arts
  • MACS Master of Arts in Cross-disciplinary Studies
  • MAHS Master of Arts in Humanities and Sciences
  • MAIS Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies
    also used for “Master of Arts in Interdisciplinary Science”
  • MALS Master of Arts in Liberal Studies
  • MA/LS Master of Arts in Liberal Studies
  • MA/OC Master of Arts in Organizational Change
  • MAP Master of Arts Program (in Interdisciplinary Studies)
  • MASC Master of Arts in Sustainable Communities
  • M.E.M. Master of Environmental Management
  • M.I.S. Master of Interdisciplinary Studies
  • MISP Master of Interdisciplinary Studies Program
  • MLA Master of Liberal Arts
  • MLAS Master of Liberal Arts & Sciences
  • M/LS Master of Liberal Studies
  • MLS Master of Liberal Studies
  • MS Master of Science
  • PIC Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture
  • QMSS Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Search by State
New York
 Buffalo State College -  MA & MS in Multidisciplinary Studies - Individualized Option
Buffalo State College - Master of Science in Creative Studies
Program Profile
Program Profile
 City University of New York (CUNY), College of Staten Island - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 Columbia University - Master of Arts in Quantitative Methods in the Social Sciences Program Profile
 Long Island University - MA & MS in Interdisciplinary Studies Program Profile
 New York University - MA & MS in Interdisciplinary Studies Program Profile
 Program Profile
 Niagara University - MA & MS in Interdisciplinary Studies Program Profile
 Skidmore College - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 St. John's University - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Albany - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton - MA & PhD in Philosophy - Social, Political, Ethical, and Legal Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Brockport - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo - Professional Science Masters Certificate Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Empire State - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Fredonia - MA & MS in Interdisciplinary Studies Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 The New School - Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile
 Utica College -Master of Arts in Liberal Studies Program Profile

Search by Program
Master of Liberal Studies/Liberal Arts (MALS) Programs
 Abilene Christian University Program Profile
 Albertus Magnus College Program Profile
 Alvernia University Program Profile
 Arkansas Tech University Program Profile
 City University of New York (CUNY)—College of Staten Island Program Profile
 Clayton State University Program Profile
 Columbia University Program Profile
 Dartmouth College Program Profile
 Duke University Program Profile
 East Tennessee State University Program Profile
 Florida Atlantic University Program Profile
 Florida International University Program Profile
 Fort Hays State University Program Profile
 Henderson State University Program Profile
 Hollins University Program Profile
 Indiana University South Bend Program Profile
 Indiana University Southeast Program Profile
 John Hopkins University Program Profile
 Kent State University Program Profile
 Lake Forest College Program Profile
 McDaniel College Program Profile
 North Carolina State University Program Profile
 Northern Arizona University Program Profile
 Northwestern University Program Profile
 Ramapo College of New Jersey Program Profile
 Reed College Program Profile
 Rice University Program Profile
 Rollins College Program Profile
 St. Edward's University Program Profile
 Southern Methodist University Program Profile
 Spring Hill College Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY)—College at Brockport Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY)—Empire State College Program Profile
 State University of New York (SUNY)—Stony Brook University Program Profile
 Texas Christian University (TCU) Program Profile
 The New School Program Profile
 Thomas Edison State College Program Profile
 Tulane University Program Profile
 University of Arkansas at Little Rock Program Profile
 University of Chicago Program Profile
 University of Detroit Mercy (two available tracks) Program Profile
 University of Denver—University College Program Profile
 University of Memphis Program Profile
 University of Miami Program Profile
 University of New Hampshire Program Profile
 University of North Carolina—Asheville Program Profile
 University of North Carolina—Charlotte Program Profile
 University of North Carolina—Greensboro Program Profile
 University of North Carolina—Wilmington Program Profile
 University of Pennsylvania Program Profile
 University of Richmond Program Profile
 University of Toledo Program Profile
 Utica College Program Profile
 Ursuline College Program Profile
 Vanderbilt University Program Profile
 Villanova University Program Profile
 Wake Forest University Program Profile
 Washburn University of Topeka Program Profile
 Wesleyan University Program Profile
 Wichita State University Program Profile
 Widener University (Certificate) Program Profile
 Winthrop University Program Profile
Other Interdisciplinary Master's Programs
Antioch University, McGregor - MA, Individualized Master of Arts (IMA) 
Arcadia University - MA, Humanities Program Profile
Buffalo State College - MS, Creative Studies
Buffalo State College - MA & MS, Multidisciplinary Studies—Individualized Option
 Program Profile
 Program Profile
California State University, East Bay at Hayward - MA, Special Major Program Profile
Dominican University of California - MA, Humanities Program Profile
Fresno Pacific University - Individualized Master of Arts Program (IMAP) Program Profile
Georgetown University - MA, Communication, Culture & Technology (CCT) Program Profile
Goddard College - MA in Individualized Studies Program Profile
Hawaii Pacific University - MA, Global Leadership and Sustainable Development
Hawaii Pacific University - MA, Organization Development and Change (MA/OC)
 Program Profile
 Program Profile
Northern Arizona University - MA, Sustainable Communities Program Profile
Nova Southeastern University - MA, Cross-Disciplinary Studies (MACS) Program Profile
Ohio State University - MA, Comparative Studies Program Profile
St. Cloud State University - MS, Social Responsibility Program Profile
State University of New York (SUNY), Binghamton - MA & PhD, Philosophy, Interpretation, and Culture Program Profile
State University of New York (SUNY), Buffalo - Professional Science Masters Certificate Program Profile
Simmons College - MA, Gender/Culture Studies (GCS) Program Profile
Towson University - MA, Humanities Program Profile
University of Colorado at Denver - MA, Humanities (two available tracks) and MA, Social Sciences (three available tracks) Program Profile
 Program Profile
University of Dallas - MA, Humanities (MAH) & Master of Humanities (MH) Program Profile
University of Florida - MS & Professional MS in Interdisciplinary Ecology Program Profile
University of Illinois at Springfield - MA, Individual Option Program Profile
University of Montana - Master of Arts in Fine Arts in Integrated Arts and Education Program Profile
University of North Dakota - Master of Environmental Management (MEM) & Master of Environmental Science (MS) Program Profile
University of Oregon - MS, Historic Preservation Program Profile
University of Texas at Arlington - MA, Interdisciplinary Science for Science Teachers Program Profile
Wright State University - MA, Humanities Program Profile

Suggest/Update a Program for the Directory

Master's Interdisciplinary Program Directory

Guidelines to Add or Update Your Program's Information


Dear Interdisciplinary Master’s Program Representative,

Thank you for your interest in submitting or updating your program’s information in the Association for Interdisciplinary Studies’ Master’s Interdisciplinary Program Directory.

Before beginning this process, please make sure that you have read the “Master’s Directory Introduction” in its entirety, as this document will help to familiarize you with the format of the directory and its criteria for inclusion. You will be submitting your information by completing the Master's Program Directory Survey in an electronic form online.

These Survey Guidelines will help you to complete the Master's Program Directory Survey, which will be used to list your program’s information on the AIS website. Please print a copy of this document before beginning so you can easily refer to it as you complete the form.

Here are some general guidelines to use when filling out the survey form:
  • Please fill in or check only the information that applies to your program.
  • The final survey that you submit should not exceed 1 page in length, so structure your responses to the “Description” and other information accordingly.
  • If you do not have information for any section of the “Program Statistics” or “Contact Information,” please enter “No information available.” All other sections of the survey need to be filled out completely.
  • When in doubt about a certain survey component, please err on the side of keeping it simple.
Basic Information
  • University name
  • Degree Title: The title of the degree
  • Program acronym: If your program has an acronym, please include the acronym on the same line as the degree title.
Program Path
  • IDS Type: After familiarizing yourself with the IDS Types in the Master’s Directory Introduction, select “Unrestricted IDS” OR “Departmentally Restricted IDS.” 
  • Program Type: After familiarizing yourself with Program Type, select “Fixed” OR “Foundational” OR “Floating” followed immediately by “IDS Program.”
  • Description: Please use the description on your program’s homepage. At the end of your description, please cite the description in the following format: (From: website) OR (From: Program PDF) etc.
Program Structure
  • Admission Requirements: Check all the admission requirements that apply to your program. Include numerical information for requirements, as indicated. DO NOT include ANY written descriptions.
  • Credit Hours: The total credits required to complete the degree (e.g. “36 credits').
  • Required Coursework: The total required credits in the degree (e.g. “12 credits”) 
    • NOTE: While most exit coursework, such as Capstone Seminars and Thesis Research courses, are required, these courses have been separated from the “Required Coursework” in order to more clearly establish what will be required for students in the program to complete the degree. Please distinguish what required coursework in your program is exit coursework, and include it in the “Exit Courses & Work” below. All other required coursework belongs in this section.
  • Individually Selected Coursework: The total individually selected credits in the degree (e.g. “18 credits”) 
    • NOTE: Many programs have degree elements such as “concentrations” or “tracks.” The “Individually Selected Coursework” section of this survey is NOT the place to explain this aspect of your program, but rather to answer for prospective students and interested scholars “How many credits of the total degree are students allowed to select on their own, assuming that they meet all the prerequisites required for registration?” In general, these are labeled “Electives.”
  • Exit Courses & Work: The total credits of exit coursework required for the degree (e.g. “6 credits”). Include the number AND kind of courses AND any required final projects or papers (e.g. “One Advanced Research Course, One Capstone Seminar, and Masters Thesis”).
  • Established Department(s) of Focus: This element of the survey is directly related to the “IDS Type” in the “Program Path” section above. If your program is “Unrestricted IDS,” check “Open.” If your program’s “IDS Type is “Departmentally Restricted IDS,” this is the section where you can list all the departments in which students are allowed to take courses. It may also be appropriate and expedient to write something like “Any Course in the College of Arts and Sciences,” if this is the case.
Program Statistics
  • Faculty: The number of department faculty, the number of associate faculty, OR no IDS specific faculty information available.
  • Students: This section lets students know what kind of students the program accepts in terms of residential requirements and full- or part-time status. Please select all phrases that are appropriate for your program from the following: “Resident students only” OR “Low-Residency students allowed” AND “Part-time students allowed.”
  • Program History: Year that the program was established.
Contact Information
  • Address: The program’s office address.
  • Phone Numbers: Program office phone number. Because of the continually shifting nature of department faculty, we encourage your program to list a set phone number for the program, instead of a faculty member’s phone number. If you would like to include both, please put the office number first. 
  • Email: Program email address. For the same reason as above, if your program would like to include a faculty email address, please put the general program email address first.
  • Website: Copy and paste the web address of your program’s homepage here.

Master's Program Directory Survey


If you have any questions that you cannot figure out with the help of these documents, please contact AIS at aisorg@oakland.edu.
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